heterokaryon


Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

het·er·o·kar·y·on

(het'ĕr-ō-kar'ē-on),
A cell containing diverse nuclei inside a common cytoplasm, usually resulting from the artificial fusion of two cells from different species.
[hetero- + G. karyon, kernel, nut]

heterokaryon

(hĕt′ər-ə-kăr′ē-ŏn′, -ən)
n.
A cell having two or more genetically different nuclei.

het′er·o·kar′y·ot′ic (-ŏt′ĭk) adj.

heterokaryon

a cell containing nuclei from two different sources, or in fungi a hyphal cell, spore, mycelium or organism that contains genetically different nuclei. see COMPLEMENTATION TEST.

heterokaryon

a single binucleate cell formed by fusing one cell with another. Fusion is usually accomplished by using inactivated parainfluenza virus or polyethylene glycol, both of which alter the cell membranes in such a way as to induce fusion.
References in periodicals archive ?
The mycelia meet in pairs, and if they are compatible, they fuse to form a heterokaryon.
In a H + h heterokaryon, the h nucleus has a proliferative advantage over the H nucleus, so that the ratio of h:H conidia from such heterokaryons is [Theta]:1 - [Theta], where 0.
First, fusion of the mycelia in pairs is highly unlikely; heterokaryon formation is not a sexual process.
In some species, Heterokaryon Self-Incompatible strains exist.
Finally, the model analyzes an Omnicompatible type in which individuals are compatible with all others (except Heterokaryon Self-Incompatibles).
The first case with n = 1 and P = 0, without Heterokaryon Self-Incompatibles and Omnicompatibles, differs from the Hartl et al.
This means that h will spread in a common VCG, but not in a rare one, because it can only profit from heterokaryon formation when it encounters enough compatible conspecifics.
Consequently, a low frequency of a VCG is disadvantageous for the h allele, which then profits little from heterokaryon formation with H.
Under these assumptions, without considering the Heterokaryon Self-Incompatibles and Omnicompatibles, with [x.
Heterokaryon incompatibility in imperfect species of Aspergillus.
Heterokaryon self-incompatibility in Gibberella fujikuroi (Fusarium moniliforme).
A Heterokaryon Self-Incompatible (HSI) type (as described in the third section of the nuclear-parasite model) can invade the population if its fitness ([f.