herpes simplex encephalitis


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her·pes sim·plex en·ceph·a·li·tis

the most common acute encephalitis, caused by HSV-1; affects people of any age; preferentially involves the inferomedial portions of the temporal lobe and the orbital portions of the frontal lobes; pathologically, severe hemorrhagic necrosis is present along with, in the acute stages, intranuclear eosinophilic inclusion bodies in the neurons and glial cells.

herpes simplex encephalitis

a necrotizing inflammation of the brain that follows an infection with herpes simplex virus. It is a common acute form of encephalitis and is similar to other viral encephalitis infections. Repeated seizures occur early in the course, and there is severe hemorrhagic necrosis. Affected areas of the brain are usually the orbital portions of the frontal lobes and the inferomedial portions of the temporal lobe. Persons of any age may be infected, but cerebral sequelae (caused by HSV2) are more likely to occur in infants. The mortality rate varies, but even desperately ill patients may recover completely.
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Herpes simplex encephalitis
References in periodicals archive ?
Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) is the most common form of sporadic nonepidemic encephalitis in immunocompetent individuals, with an incidence of 0.
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If you account for the fact that most West Nile cases are concentrated in the summer months and in certain geographic areas, whereas herpes of course is year-round and not with any geographic predilection, in some of those areas the relative incidence of West Nile encephalitis over herpes simplex encephalitis is actually quite large," said Dr.
Virological diagnosis of herpes simplex encephalitis.
Gethin was treated for suspected meningitis and staff did not immediately give him anti-viral drugs which would have treated him for herpes simplex encephalitis.
John Mealey, 23, was suffering from the rare brain-attacking virus herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) when he was admitted to Fazaker-ley hospital.