herpangina


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herpangina

 [herp″an-ji´nah]
an infectious disease caused by either group A or B coxsackievirus or by echoviruses, chiefly affecting young children in the summer, and characterized by vesiculoulcerative lesions on the mucous membranes of the mouth and throat, dysphagia, fever, vomiting, and prostration.

her·pan·gi·na

(her-pan'ji-nă),
A disease caused by types of Coxsackievirus and marked by vesiculopapular lesions about 1-2 mm in diameter that are present around the fauces and soon break down to form grayish yellow ulcers; accompanied by sudden onset of fever, loss of appetite, dysphagia, sore throat, and sometimes abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting.
[G. herpēs, vesicular eruption, + L. angina, quinsy, fr. ango, to strangle]

herpangina

/herp·an·gi·na/ (her″pan-ji´nah) herpes angina; an infectious febrile disease due to a coxsackievirus, marked by vesicular or ulcerated lesions on the fauces or soft palate.

herpangina

[hur′panjī′nə]
Etymology: Gk, herpein, to creep; L, angina, quinsy
a viral infection, usually of young children, characterized by sore throat, headache, anorexia, and pain in the abdomen, neck, and extremities. Febrile convulsions and vomiting may occur in infants. Papules or vesicles may form in the pharynx and on the tongue, the palate, or the tonsils. The lesions evolve into shallow ulcers that heal spontaneously. The disease usually runs its course in less than 1 week. Treatment is symptomatic. The cause is often infection by a strain of coxsackie virus, typically coxsackie virus A. If similar shallow, blister-like lesions appear on the soles of the feet or the palms of the hands, it is called hand-foot-and-mouth disease.
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Herpangina

herpangina

An acute painful infection of the mouth of young children, typically caused by coxsackie virus A, less commonly by coxsackievirus B or echoviruses. Herpangina has also been used for recurrent herpetiform ulcers lesions, including canker sores (recurrent aphthous stomatitis).

herpangina

Infectious disease A coxsackievirus infection characterized by a prodrome with fever, sore throat, headache, followed by painful papules that ulcerate. See Coxsackievirus.

her·pan·gi·na

(hĕr-pan'ji-nă)
A disease caused by types of Coxsackie virus and marked by vesiculopapular lesions around the fauces that break down to form grayish yellow ulcers.

herpangina

A virus infection mainly affecting children under 7 and featuring fever, severe sore throat, loss of appetite (anorexia), and greyish-white blister-like spots on and around the tonsils. Herpangina is caused by a coxsackie virus and is similar to HAND, FOOT AND MOUTH DISEASE.

her·pan·gi·na

(hĕr-pan'ji-nă)
Disease caused by Coxsackievirus marked by vesiculopapular lesions about 1-2 mm in diameter that are present around the fauces and soon break down to form grayish yellow ulcers.

herpangina (hur´panjī´nə),

n (Coxsackie A disease), a viral disease of children, usually occurring in summer, and characterized by sudden onset, fever (100° to 105° F; 38° to 40.5° C), sore throat, and oropharyngeal vesicles. Herpangina results from Coxsackie A viruses and is self-limiting.
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Herpangina.
herpangina aphthous ulcer,
References in periodicals archive ?
Recurrent attacks of herpangina may result from infection with different strains of the virus.
Although only five of the 33 (15%) samples were positive, those five samples were collected when patients with herpangina visited the emergency room.
The primary endpoint was the occurrence of EV71-associated HFMD, or herpangina.
Suspected herpangina cases were defined as painful blisters in the mouth only, predominantly on the soft palate.
In Taiwan and Japan, the emergence of these strains has been associated with a change in the predominant clinical expression of the infections produced by CVA6, from herpangina before 2009 to HFMD in 2010-2011 (7,8).
To the Editor: Coxsackievirus A6 (CVA6) is a human enterovirus associated with herpangina in infants.
According to a Japanese Infectious Agents Surveillance Report, this virus is one of the major causes of herpangina, an acute febrile disease characterized by vesicles, ulcers, and redness around the uvula, which occurs mainly in young children and infants.
Other HEV-A serotypes, such as CVA4, CVA5, CVA6, and CVA10, have also been reported in cases of HFMD and herpangina, a disease that shares clinical symptoms with HFMD (6-9).
Furthermore, EV71 was detected in 2 of the 187 case-patients in which meningitis without HFMD or herpangina was diagnosed.
In general, CVA6 infections have been seldom detected and mostly in association with herpangina (13,14).
Enteroviruses (EVs) cause a wide variety of diseases that range from nonspecific viral illness to mild infections of herpangina and hand, foot, and mouth disease to potentially serious diseases such as myopericarditis, meningitis, myelitis, and neonatal sepsis.
During March through October 2006, samples from at least 100 patients from Brunei diagnosed with hand, foot, and mouth disease or herpangina were received at the University Malaya Medical Center, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.