herpangina


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herpangina

 [herp″an-ji´nah]
an infectious disease caused by either group A or B coxsackievirus or by echoviruses, chiefly affecting young children in the summer, and characterized by vesiculoulcerative lesions on the mucous membranes of the mouth and throat, dysphagia, fever, vomiting, and prostration.

her·pan·gi·na

(her-pan'ji-nă),
A disease caused by types of Coxsackievirus and marked by vesiculopapular lesions about 1-2 mm in diameter that are present around the fauces and soon break down to form grayish yellow ulcers; accompanied by sudden onset of fever, loss of appetite, dysphagia, sore throat, and sometimes abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting.
[G. herpēs, vesicular eruption, + L. angina, quinsy, fr. ango, to strangle]

herpangina

/herp·an·gi·na/ (her″pan-ji´nah) herpes angina; an infectious febrile disease due to a coxsackievirus, marked by vesicular or ulcerated lesions on the fauces or soft palate.

herpangina

[hur′panjī′nə]
Etymology: Gk, herpein, to creep; L, angina, quinsy
a viral infection, usually of young children, characterized by sore throat, headache, anorexia, and pain in the abdomen, neck, and extremities. Febrile convulsions and vomiting may occur in infants. Papules or vesicles may form in the pharynx and on the tongue, the palate, or the tonsils. The lesions evolve into shallow ulcers that heal spontaneously. The disease usually runs its course in less than 1 week. Treatment is symptomatic. The cause is often infection by a strain of coxsackie virus, typically coxsackie virus A. If similar shallow, blister-like lesions appear on the soles of the feet or the palms of the hands, it is called hand-foot-and-mouth disease.
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Herpangina

herpangina

An acute painful infection of the mouth of young children, typically caused by coxsackie virus A, less commonly by coxsackievirus B or echoviruses. Herpangina has also been used for recurrent herpetiform ulcers lesions, including canker sores (recurrent aphthous stomatitis).

herpangina

Infectious disease A coxsackievirus infection characterized by a prodrome with fever, sore throat, headache, followed by painful papules that ulcerate. See Coxsackievirus.

her·pan·gi·na

(hĕr-pan'ji-nă)
A disease caused by types of Coxsackie virus and marked by vesiculopapular lesions around the fauces that break down to form grayish yellow ulcers.

herpangina

A virus infection mainly affecting children under 7 and featuring fever, severe sore throat, loss of appetite (anorexia), and greyish-white blister-like spots on and around the tonsils. Herpangina is caused by a coxsackie virus and is similar to HAND, FOOT AND MOUTH DISEASE.

her·pan·gi·na

(hĕr-pan'ji-nă)
Disease caused by Coxsackievirus marked by vesiculopapular lesions about 1-2 mm in diameter that are present around the fauces and soon break down to form grayish yellow ulcers.

herpangina (hur´panjī´nə),

n (Coxsackie A disease), a viral disease of children, usually occurring in summer, and characterized by sudden onset, fever (100° to 105° F; 38° to 40.5° C), sore throat, and oropharyngeal vesicles. Herpangina results from Coxsackie A viruses and is self-limiting.
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Herpangina.
herpangina aphthous ulcer,
References in periodicals archive ?
The objectives of this study were to describe the epidemiology of enterovirus serotypes associated with HFMD and herpangina in France and to compare the clinical characteristics of HFMD and herpangina according to enterovirus serotypes.
Oral lesions in herpangina consist of two to six red macules which form fragile vesicles that break up quickly leaving ulcers.
Recurrent attacks of herpangina may result from infection with different strains of the virus.
We categorized the doctors' diagnoses into (a) upper respiratory tract infections (URI), comprising URI, pharyngitis, and tonsillitis; (b) lower respiratory infections (LRI), including bronchiolitis, bronchitis, bronchopneumonia, or pneumonia; and (c) herpangina (if an oral ulcer over the throat or uvula was present).
Los que tienen tendinitis, herpangina, fibromialgia o alta la presion arterial.
The differential diagnosis of HSV presentations include syphilitic chancre, fixed-drug eruption, gonococcal erosion, folliculitis, bullous impetigo, contact dermatitis, herpangina, aphthous stomatitis, hand-foot-mouth disease, varicella zoster, contact dermatitis, cellulitis, and erythema multiforme (Andreae, 2004; Blevins, 2003; Yeung-Yue et al, 2002).
Viruses known to produce this illness include herpes simplex (especially Type 1), herpangina producing viruses, and hand-foot-mouth syndrome viruses.
Moreover, the primary symptoms of enterovirus D68 infection are fever, runny nose and cough and infected individuals rarely develop typical symptoms of enterovirus infection such as herpangina and hand, foot, and mouth disease, according to Taiwan CDC.
Similar to EV-D68, EV-A71 was initially linked to nonneurologic syndromes, specifically herpangina and hand, foot, and mouth disease, before outbreak data conclusively revealed an association between EVA71 and neurologic syndromes.
Although most infected persons are asymptomatic, mild presentations can include respiratory infections, herpangina, and hand, foot, and mouth disease.
Epidemiologic features of hand-foot-mouth disease and herpangina caused by enterovirus 71 in Taiwan, 1998-2005.
Herpangina (a coxsackie viral disease) characteristically includes vesicles on the back portion of the oral cavity and palate, along with an inflamed pharynx.