hereditary

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hereditary

 [hĕ-red´ĭ-tar″e]
transmissible or transmitted from parent to offspring; genetically determined.

he·red·i·tar·y

(hĕ-red'i-ter-ē),
Transmissible from parent to offspring by information encoded in the parental germ cell.
[L. hereditarius; fr. heres (hered-), an heir]

hereditary

/he·red·i·tary/ (hĕ-red´ĭ-tar-e) genetically transmitted from parent to offspring.

hereditary

(hə-rĕd′ĭ-tĕr′ē)
adj.
1.
a. Of or relating to heredity or inheritance.
b. Transmitted or capable of being transmitted genetically from parent to offspring: a hereditary disease.
2.
a. Passed down from one generation to the next: a hereditary prejudice.
b. Being such or possessed by reason of birth: a hereditary aristocracy.
3. Law
a. Capable of being inherited.
b. Descending from an ancestor to a legal heir; passing down by inheritance.
c. Having title or possession through inheritance.

he·red′i·tar′i·ly (-târ′ə-lē) adv.
he·red′i·tar′i·ness n.

hereditary

[həred′iter′ē]
Etymology: L, hereditas, inheritance
transmitted from parent to offspring; inborn; inherited. Compare acquired, congenital, familial.

retinal vasculopathy with cerebral leukodystrophy

A microvascular endotheliopathy of the retina (OMIM:192315) of middle-age onset characterised by telangiectasias, microaneurysms and retinal capillary obliteration beginning in the macula, and microinfarcts of cerebral white matter that often coalesce to form pseudotumours.

Molecular pathology
Caused by defects of TREX1, which encodes a nuclear protein with 3' exonuclease activity.

hereditary

 adjective Transferred via genes from parent to child

he·red·i·tar·y

(hĕr-edi-tar-ē)
Transmissible from parent to offspring by information encoded in the parental germ cell.
[L. hereditarius; fr. heres (hered-), an heir]

Hereditary

Something which is inherited-passed down from parents to offspring. In biology and medicine, the word pertains to inherited genetic characteristics.
Mentioned in: Amniocentesis, Ptosis

hereditary

Pertains to a condition that is genetically transmitted from parent to offspring. See acquired; congenital; familial; inheritance.

he·red·i·tar·y

(hĕr-edi-tar-ē)
Transmissible from parent to offspring by information encoded in the parental germ cell.
[L. hereditarius; fr. heres (hered-), an heir]

hereditary

transmissible or transmitted from parent to offspring; genetically determined.

hereditary ataxia
occurs in smooth-haired Fox terriers and Jack Russell terriers and is progressive over a long period, commencing at 2 to 4 months of age; characterized by symmetrical demyelination within the spinal cord.
hereditary collagen dysplasia
a group of diseases which occur in most species and are characterized by looseness and stretchability of the skin, often accompanied by laxity of the joints and occasionally by absence of the tooth enamel. The inherited defect is one of deficient collagen synthesis. See also dermatosparaxis, ehlers-danlos syndrome. Called also hyperelastosis cutis, rubber-puppy syndrome.
hereditary defect
anatomical or functional defect conditioned in its appearance by inherited factors.
hereditary melanoma
benign, heritable, cutaneous tumor of pigs.
hereditary thrombopathias
an inherited bleeding tendency in which the platelets do not function properly. Recorded in cattle and dogs.

Patient discussion about hereditary

Q. Is Autism hereditary? My 3 year old son has been diagnosed with autism last year. I am now pregnant with my second child and am scared that he will too have autism.

A. There is a higher chance that your additional children will have autism too, however its not a given. Be more alert and notice any early signs that your child may develop.

Q. Is Leukemia hereditary? My Grandpa died of Leukemia when he was 50. I am worried that it might be hereditary. Is it?

A. Overall leukemia is not hereditary but there are rare reports of family clusters, that is, more than one case in a family. Therefore, you should consult your Doctor and tell him about your family's medical history.

Q. Is migraine hereditary? If both my parents suffer from migraines does it mean I can't avoid it?

A. Yes, migraines do have a very strong genetic correlation. However, it does not mean that if both your parents have it, you will have it too for 100%. It means only that you have a much higher risk than the regular population, that does not have migraines in their family, to suffer from this condition.

More discussions about hereditary
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