hereditability


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Related to hereditability: narrow sense heritability

hereditability

[həred′itəbil′itē]
Etymology: L, hereditas, inheritance
the degree to which a specific trait is controlled by inheritance.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hereditability estimates for weight and DWG ranged between medium and high magnitude (Table 4).
High rates of additive genetic variances ratio and high rates of hereditability for morphometric traits in females demonstrate decrease in the participation of environmental effects within total variation.
Terman held steadfast to the idea of hereditability rather than environment (or a combination of the two) to explain superior intelligence or giftedness.
Central to the idea of hereditability, but rarely discussed, is the notion that intelligence--or empathy or courage or cruelty--can be, at least according to some theories, pinpointed to a particular place in a person's body or brain.
Genetics has been an area of research funded by the National Alliance for Autism Research since NAAR first began awarding grants and remains an area of intense focus because of autism's apparent hereditability.
Evidence from neuroscience and hereditability studies leads to the conclusion that genetic forces may be clearly at work in the perception of self.
Granted the very obvious differences between mouse and horse, the generally accepted belief that hereditability of athletic merit in the latter is under 40 per cent, and the fact that nobody has yet identified which genes are primarily responsible for it, the mere acquisition of a technique for gene modification seems unlikely to serve much purpose.
2] fixation and plant development, hereditability of seed growth traits, and various aspects of global climate change on crop production.
Not only has his stock increased, but this indicates that the variety has elements of hereditability.
43) As a counterstrategy, dissatisfied lords began usurping formerly public offices, turning them into patrimonies that implied hereditability, and enserfing a hitherto free peasantry.
Since estimates of maternal hereditability had higher rates between birth and two months old, a greater participation of maternal effect could be denoted in the performance of animals during the period (Figure 2B).
The number of loci and alleles involved, the addition effect of each allele, the number of fixed effects and their greatness and the rates of hereditability, genetic averages, phenotype average and phenotype variance, population size, male: female proportion, number of female descendants-1 and number of generations are defined in the Genesys simulation process.