hepatic ischemia

hepatic ischemia

injury to liver cells resulting from a deficiency of blood or oxygen, caused by hypotension from decreased cardiac output, shock, or some other cause. Also called hypoxic hepatitis, ischemic hepatitis, shock liver.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Endogenous A1 adenosine receptors protect against hepatic ischemia reperfusion injury in mice.
The occurrence of BCS was associated with bile duct tissue damage, but BCS in itself is not caused by a single pathological factor, and might instead be associated with functional recovery, biliary strictures and obstruction, acute and chronic rejection, recurrent cholangitis, cold and warm ischemia episodes, hepatic ischemia, and reperfusion injury.
Hepatic ischemia is detected after cardiac surgery with CPB, which is usu-ally marked with an increase in alanine aminotransfe-rase (ALT) enzyme levels.
2) On ultrasound, geographic areas of decreased echogenicity with preservation of portal tracts are early signs of hepatic ischemia and may resolve completely or progress to true infarction.
Human activated protein C attenuates both hepatic and renal injury caused by hepatic ischemia and reperfusion injury in mice.
Hepatic congestion occurs during occlusion over the hepatic veins, but is relieved by repositioning, and the risk of hepatic ischemia, that is otherwise associated with IVC thrombectomy, is avoided.
Hepatic ischemia which is a frequent problem encountered in clinical conditions such as liver transplantations, liver deficiency and liver surgery results in functional and structural defects in hepato-cytes (Debonera et al.
Analysis of all postoperative measurements showed that cholesterol was correlated directly with the preoperative concentration, albumin, total protein, fibrinogen, urate, alkaline phosphatase and y-glutamyltranspeptidase (accounting for cholestasis), prothrombin activity, hematocrit, hemoglobin, and red blood cell and platelet counts, and inversely with total and indirect bilirubin, white blood cell count, number of resected segments, and duration of operation and hepatic ischemia.
Recent studies have suggested that the most detrimental factor in cellular necrosis after temporary and permanent hepatic ischemia is the reperfusion injury [5].
Hepatic ischemia reperfusion injury (HIRI) is a major cause for acute postoperative liver dysfunction and liver failure.
The authors established a 70% hepatic ischemia model by occluding blood flow to the left and caudate lobes of the liver.