heparin


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Related to heparin: Heparin induced thrombocytopenia

heparin

 [hep´ah-rin]
1. an acid mucopolysaccharide present in many tissues, especially the liver and lungs, and having potent anticoagulant properties. It also has lipotrophic properties, promoting transfer of fat from blood to the fat depots by activation of the enzyme lipoprotein lipase.
2. a mixture of active principles capable of prolonging blood clotting time, obtained from domestic animals; used in the prophylaxis and treatment of clotting disorders, such as thrombophlebitis, pulmonary embolism, disseminated intravascular coagulation, acute myocardial infarction, or stroke syndrome, and to prevent clotting during extracorporeal circulation, blood transfusion, and blood sampling.
heparin lock a type of intermittent intravenous device for the administration of heparin. It does not require a continuous flow of fluids; the intravenous fluid flow can be disconnected and the heparin lock filled with a heparin solution that maintains patency of the needle.
Two types of heparin or saline lock sets. From Lammon et al., 1995.

hep·a·rin

(hep'ă-rin),
An anticoagulant principle that is a component of various tissues (especially liver and lung) and mast cells in humans and several mammalian species; its principal and active constituent is a glycosaminoglycan composed of d-glucuronic acid and d-glucosamine, both sulfated, in 1,4-α linkage, of molecular weight between 6,000 and 20,000. In conjunction with a serum protein cofactor (the so-called heparin cofactor), heparin acts as an antithrombin and an antiprothrombin. Synthetic preparations are commonly used in therapeutic anticoagulation. It also enhances activity of "clearing factors" (lipoprotein lipases).
Synonym(s): heparinic acid

heparin

/hep·a·rin/ (hep´ah-rin) a sulfated glycosaminoglycan of mixed composition, released by mast cells and by blood basophils in many tissues, especially the liver and lungs, and having potent anticoagulant properties. It also has lipotrophic properties, promoting transfer of fat from blood to the fat depots by activation of lipoprotein lipase. It is used as the calcium or sodium salt in the prophylaxis and treatment of disorders in which there is excessive or undesirable clotting and to prevent clotting during extracorporeal circulation, blood transfusion, and blood sampling.

heparin

(hĕp′ər-ĭn)
n.
An acidic glycosaminoglycan found especially in lung and liver tissue and having the ability to slow the clotting of blood, used as a drug in the treatment of thrombosis.

heparin

[hep′ərin]
Etymology: Gk, hēpar, liver
a naturally occurring mucopolysaccharide that acts in the body as an antithrombin factor to prevent intravascular clotting. The substance is produced by basophils and mast cells, which are found in large numbers in the connective tissue surrounding capillaries, particularly in the lungs and liver. In the form of sodium salt, heparin is used therapeutically as an anticoagulant. See also heparin sodium.

heparin

Hematology A sulfated glycosaminoglycan anticoagulant that inhibits activated factors IXa, Xa, XIa, XIIa and thrombin, ↓ local anti-thrombin-III, promoting its inactivation by neutrophil elastase; interaction of heparin with endothelial cells results in displacement of platelet factor 4, which inactivates heparin Indications Thromboembolism, CAD, post acute MI, PTE Monitoring Titrate heparin so that aPTT is 1.5-2.0-fold normal Side effects Hemorrhage, thrombocytopenia, osteoporosis, skin necrosis, alopecia, hypersensitivity, hypoaldosteronism. See Low-molecular weight heparin.

hep·a·rin

(hep'ăr-in)
An anticoagulant that is a component of various tissues (especially liver and lung) and mast cells. Its principal active constituent is a glycosaminoglycan composed of d-glucuronic acid and d-glucosamine. In conjunction with a serum protein cofactor (the so-called heparin cofactor), heparin acts as an antithrombin and an antiprothrombin by preventing platelet agglutination and consequent thrombus formation.

heparin

A complex polysaccharide organic acid found mainly in lung and liver tissue. Heparin is thought to bind to THROMBIN and antithrombin in plasma thereby assisting in their combination and interfering with the cascade of reactions that end in blood clotting (coagulation). From the Greek hepar , the liver. The drug is on the WHO official list. Heparin is widely used as an anticoagulant under brand names such as Calciparine, Canusal, Hepsal, Monoparin and Multiparin. See also LOW MOLECULAR WEIGHT HEPARIN.

heparin

a mucopolysaccharide molecule produced in the liver and some white blood-cells that acts as an anticoagulant, inhibiting the transformation of prothrombin to thrombin, a vital stage in BLOOD CLOTTING.

Heparin

An organic acid that occurs naturally in the body and prevents blood clots. Heparin is also made synthetically and can be given as a treatment when required.

heparin

endogenous, short-acting anticoagulant that prevents platelet agglutination and thrombus formation; used as a continuous infusion in the treatment of deep venous thrombosis (DVT)
  • low-molecular-weight heparin longer-acting heparin derivatives, e.g. Fragmin 2500 units (used as subcuticular injection 1-2 hours before orthopaedic surgery, and thence daily for 5-7 days) to minimize postoperative DVT, or as 5000 unit injections daily (as treatment of DVT)

heparin

an acid mucopolysaccharide present in many tissues, especially the liver and lungs, and having potent anticoagulant properties. It also has lipotrophic properties, promoting transfer of fat from blood to the fat depots by activation of lipoprotein lipase. Also, a mixture of active principles capable of prolonging blood clotting time, obtained from domestic animals; used in the prophylaxis and treatment of disorders in which there is excessive or undesirable clotting and as a preservative for blood specimens.
References in periodicals archive ?
The report on global heparin market by products has been studied for unfractionated heparin, low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) and ultra-low molecular weight heparin (ULMWH).
Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is a relatively common complication affecting approximately 5%-30% of patients exposed to heparin.
Facing the problem of heparin contamination with economic constraints, we attempted to use polybrene for neutralization by manually mixing this reagent with heparin-contaminated plasma, and then performing aPTT analysis using an automated analyzer.
Completely transition to newly labeled heparin and discard older vials.
40), and this result was confirmed with high-dose heparin neutralization.
Bu in vitro calismada; akut lenfoblastik losemi (ALL) tamisi alan hastalarda farkli heparin konsantrasyonlarinin lenfoblast hucre dongusundeki fazlara etkisi arastirildi.
Our study was aimed at determining the levels of circulating plasma heparin in asthmatic patients compared with healthy individuals, based on the proposed role of heparin as an anti-asthmatic agent.
5-5% of patients on IV heparin, 5-10 days into therapy (6,7,8) (a distinguishing factor from HIT I); but can occur with any heparin exposure (heparin flushes, heparin coated catheters, etc.
Materials in the packet include a sample attorney intake form, a sample complaint, pretrial orders from In re Heparin Liability Litigation MDL 1953, a heparin time line, testimony from the House Energy and Commerce Subcommittee Hearing on Oversight and Investigations, FDA documents, a survey of news articles and medical journals, and more.
Eleven countries have detected OSCS in heparin products, the pharmaceutical ingredients are sourced from China.
Janet Woodcock, director of the FDA's Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, said that there is a "solid, mechanistic link" between oversulfated chon-droitin sulfate (OSCS)--identified by the agency in March as the heparinlike contaminant--and the types of adverse reactions associated with heparin products that have been reported to the FDA.
The preliminary survey results indicate that 90% of respondents (n= 195) maintain heparin as stock in patient care areas and 55% of these have no safeguards in place to avoid mix-ups between heparin products of different concentrations (ISMP Canada, 2007 December).