hemosiderosis


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Related to hemosiderosis: hemochromatosis

hemosiderosis

 [he″mo-sid″ĕ-ro´sis]
a focal or general increase in tissue iron stores without associated tissue damage.
hepatic hemosiderosis the deposit of an abnormal quantity of hemosiderin in the liver, when this is not associated with cirrhosis, as hemochromatosis is.
pulmonary hemosiderosis the deposition of abnormal amounts of hemosiderin in the lungs, due to bleeding into the lung interstitium.

he·mo·sid·er·o·sis

(hē'mō-sid'ĕr-ō'sis),
Accumulation of hemosiderin in tissue, particularly in liver and spleen. See: hemochromatosis.
[hemosiderin + -osis, condition]

hemosiderosis

/he·mo·sid·er·o·sis/ (-sid″er-o´sis) a focal or general increase in tissue iron stores without associated tissue damage.
pulmonary hemosiderosis  the deposition of abnormal amounts of hemosiderin in the lungs, due to bleeding into the lung interstitium.

hemosiderosis

[hē′mōsid′ərō′sis, hem′-]
Etymology: Gk, haima + sideros, iron, osis, condition
an increased deposition of iron in a variety of tissues, usually in the form of hemosiderin and usually without tissue damage. It is often associated with diseases involving chronic, extensive destruction of red blood cells, such as thalassemia major. Compare hemochromatosis, sideroblastic anemia. See also ferritin, iron transport, siderosis, thalassemia, transferrin.

hemosiderosis

An iron overload syndrome arbitrarily differentiated from hemochromatosis by the reversible nature of the iron accumulation in the reticuloendothelial system. See Hemochromatosis.

he·mo·sid·er·o·sis

(hē'mō-sid-ĕr-ō'sis)
Accumulation of hemosiderin in tissue, particularly in the liver and spleen.
See: hemochromatosis
Synonym(s): haemosiderosis.
[hemosiderin + -osis, condition]

Hemosiderosis

An overload of iron in the body resulting from repeated blood transfusions. Hemosiderosis occurs most often in patients with thalassemia.
Mentioned in: Iron Tests

he·mo·sid·er·o·sis

(hē'mō-sid-ĕr-ō'sis)
Accumulation of hemosiderin in tissue, particularly in liver and spleen.
Synonym(s): haemosiderosis.
[hemosiderin + -osis, condition]

hemosiderosis (hē´mōsid´ərō´sis),

n a focal or general increase in tissue iron stores without associated tissue damage.

hemosiderosis

a focal or general increase in tissue iron (hemosiderin) stores without associated tissue damage.

pulmonary hemosiderosis
the deposition of abnormal amounts of hemosiderin in the lungs, due to bleeding into the lung interstitium.
References in periodicals archive ?
Renal hemosiderosis is a rare cause of renal failure that can occur in diseases characterized by chronic intravascular hemolysis and lead to a black kidney.
Treatment of pediatric idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis with low-dose cyclophosphamide.
The Pulmonary Hemosiderosis Prevention Program (PHPP) was established by the local public health community in 1996 and supported with funding through public health agencies and local foundations.
Because of the differing echo times (TEs) of in-phase and out-of-phase sequences, their combined acquisition also provides information on magnetic susceptibility, and therefore pathologic conditions such as hemochromatosis or hemosiderosis can be identified and characterized with a high level of confidence.
Hemosiderosis in thalassemia is secondary to frequent transfusions and increased iron absorption associated with ineffective erythropoiesis.
Study of toxin production by isolates of Stachybotrys chartarum and Memnoniella echinata isolated during a study of pulmonary hemosiderosis in infants.
Deferasirox, an orally administered iron chelating agent taken once a day, was unanimously backed for approval by the Food and Drug Administration's Blood Products Advisory Panel for treating transfusional hemosiderosis.
hemosiderosis from any cause, atransferrinemia, paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, iron deficiency); and (S) mental illness rendering the person unable to understand the nature, scope, and possible consequences of the study.
Several reports also suggest that severe illnesses may be attributed to exposures to mycotoxins, including organic dust toxic syndrome and pulmonary hemosiderosis, although causation has not yet been definitively established (CDC, 2000; Etzel et al.
1-6) Travis et al (7) described 34 cases of diffuse pulmonary hemorrhage, reporting 43% of the cases caused by vasculitis, 13% caused by anti-basement membrane antibodies, 13% caused by idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis, 18% caused by pulmonary renal syndrome, and 13% caused by SLE or rheumatoid arthritis.