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hemorrhagic shock

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hemorrhagic shock
n.
Hypovolemic shock resulting from acute hemorrhage and characterized by hypotension, tachycardia, oliguria, and by pale, cold, and clammy skin.

hemorrhagic shock,
shock associated with the sudden and rapid loss of significant amounts of blood. Severe traumatic injuries often cause such blood losses. This results in inadequate perfusion to meet the metabolic demands of cellular function. Death occurs within a relatively short time unless transfusion quickly restores normal blood volume. Hemorrhagic shock often accompanies secondary shock. Compare primary shock.

shock,
n 1. a state of collapse of the body after injury or trauma. Shock may be either primary or secondary. The principal effects of shock are slowing of the peripheral blood flow and reduction in cardiac output.
2. a circulatory insufficiency caused by a disparity between circulating blood volume and vascular capacity.
shock, galvanic,
n pain produced as a result of galvanic currents caused by similar or dissimilar metallic restorations.
shock, hemorrhagic,
n an ineffectual circulating volume of blood resulting from loss of whole blood.
shock, insulin,
n a coma resulting from too much insulin or an inadequate intake of food. Symptoms include wet or moist skin, hypersalivation or drooling, normal blood pressure, tremors, dilated pupils, normal or bounding pulse, and firm eyeballs. Sugar and acetoacetic acid may be present in bladder urine but are absent in the second specimen. The blood sugar is low (hypoglycemia). See also coma, diabetic.
shock, neurogenic,
n shock caused by loss of nervous control of peripheral vessels, resulting in an increase in the vascular capacity. Onset is usually sudden but is quickly reversible if the cause is removed and treatment is instituted immediately.
shock, primary,
n shock that has a neurogenic basis in which pain and psychic factors affect the vascular system. Occurs immediately after an injury.
shock, secondary,
n shock that occurs some time after the injury (6 to 24 hours later). It is associated with changes in capillary permeability and subsequent loss of plasma into the tissue spaces. Changes in capillary permeability are probably related to histamine release associated with tissue injury.
shock, traumatic,
n a shock produced by trauma, whether psychic or physical. In general usage, this term refers to shock following physical trauma, with hemorrhage, peripheral blood vessel dilation, and changes in capillary permeability.

hemorrhagic
pertaining to or characterized by hemorrhage.

hemorrhagic bowel disease of swine
see proliferative hemorrhagic enteropathy.
canine hemorrhagic fever
see canine ehrlichiosis.
hemorrhagic diathesis
a tendency to bleed due to any one or a combination of clotting defects. Occurs, for example, in diseases of liver in which there may be defects in the prothrombin complex, or in fibrinogen or thromboplastin availability. See hemophilia, purpura hemorrhagica, disseminated intravascular coagulation.
hemorrhagic disease
an undifferentiated disease manifested by unprovoked hemorrhage and caused by any one of a number of factors. See also hemophilia, epizootic hemorrhagic disease of deer, warfarin, canine ehrlichiosis, hemorrhagic syndrome (below).
hemorrhagic disease of the newborn
see neonatal hemorrhagic disease (below).
hemorrhagic enteritis
an acute, highly fatal disease of turkeys over 4 weeks of age characterized by bloody droppings, a short course and a high prevalence and caused by an adenovirus.
hemorrhagic enterotoxemia
profound toxemia accompanied by hemorrhagic enteritis. It is caused by Clostridium perfringens types A, B, C and E.
hemorrhagic foal enteritis
see antibiotic-associated colitis.
neonatal hemorrhagic disease
hemorrhagic disease of the newborn; may be due to maternal isoimmunization, e.g. in pigs. See also umbilical hemorrhage.
hemorrhagic septicemia
a septicemic pasteurellosis of cattle and other ruminants, rarely of pigs and horses. It is caused by Pasteurella multocida type 1 (or B) rarely D or E, and characterized by a sudden onset of high fever, dyspnea, salivation, hot painful subcutaneous swellings and submucosal petechiae and death in about 24 hours. Called also septicemic pasteurellosis, el guedda.
Occurs also in finfish, caused by opportunist bacteria including Aeromonas, Pseudomonas spp.
hemorrhagic shock
see shock.
hemorrhagic syndrome
a widespread disease of domestic fowl causing significant losses due to death in birds about 5 to 9 weeks of age. The cause may be multifactorial but viruses are suspected to play an important role. Characterized by clinical anemia, leukopenia, anemia and hemorrhages in all tissues.

hem·or·rhag·ic shock
hypovolemic shock resulting from acute hemorrhage, characterized by hypotension, tachycardia, pale, cold, and clammy skin, and oliguria.

hem·or·rhag·ic shock (hem'ŏr-aj'ik shok)
Hypovolemic shock resulting from acute hemorrhage, characterized by hypotension; tachycardia; pale, cold, and clammy skin; and oliguria.
Synonym(s): haemorrhagic shock.

hem·or·rhag·ic shock (hem'ŏr-aj'ik shok)
Hypovolemic shock resulting from acute hemorrhage, characterized by hypotension; tachycardia; pale, cold, and clammy skin; and oliguria.
Synonym(s): haemorrhagic shock.


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The clinical trial was a multi-center, randomized, double-blind, controlled study that enrolled patients suffering from hemorrhagic shock with lactic acidosis at 53 trial sites in 15 countries.
The protein is often used in the manufacture of vaccines and drugs and is given to patients with serious burn injuries, hemorrhagic shock and liver disease, the researchers said.
The protein is often used in the manufacture of vaccines and drugs and is given to patients with serious burn injuries, hemorrhagic shock and liver disease, the researchers said.
 
 
 
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