hemolytic transfusion reaction


Also found in: Acronyms.

hemolytic transfusion reaction

Transfusion medicine A therapy-related event mediated by 2 different mechanisms:
1. Intravascular hemolysis mediated by complement-fixing antibodies,.
2. Extravascular hemolysis mediated by noncomplement-fixing antibodies Clinical Fever, chills, pain at infusion site, intense back pain, hypotension, sense of impending doom, chest tightness, acute dyspnea, brochospasm, anaphylaxis, hyperbilirubinemia, hemoglobinuria, DIC with fibrinolysis Management Stop transfusion, treat shock–vasopressors, IV fluids, cortiocosteroids, maintain high fluid throughput, monitor anemia, transfuse with compatible blood.

hemolytic transfusion reaction

The destruction of donated and infused red blood cells by antibodies in the person receiving the transfusion.
See: transfusion reaction
References in periodicals archive ?
Ten patients were at risk for a hemolytic transfusion reaction if, by chance, red cells that possessed the antigen or antigens to which the patients had antibody had been released on an emergency uncrossmatched basis.
0% of which were hemolytic transfusion reactions due to single or multiple clinically significant antibodies that were not detected in pretransfusion testing.
Risk of hemolytic transfusion reactions following emergency-release RBC transfusion.
Anti-AnWj causing acute hemolytic transfusion reactions in a patient with aplastic anemia.
Fatal delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction without previous blood transfusion.
Release of mediators of systemic inflammatory response syndrome in the course of a severe delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction caused by anti-D.
The most common causes of IgG-mediated hemolysis are warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia (WAIHA) and delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction (DHTR).
The antibody does have clinical significance as it can cause mild hemolytic transfusion reactions and hemolytic disease of the newborn.
The other important lesson is that piperacillin-induced HA can mimic autoimmune HA and delayed hemolytic transfusion reactions (1,2).
Our patient had three Rhesus blood group alloantibodies, including anti-V, -c, and -E, all of which have been associated with life-threatening hemolytic transfusion reactions (7).