hemiparetic gait

hemiparetic gait

A gait disorder characterised by extension and circumduction of one leg.

Clinical findings
Weakness on affected side, hyperreflexia, extensor plantar response, flexed arm and hand across the front of the body.
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References in periodicals archive ?
On neurologic examination, we obtained right-sided hemiparesis with hemiparetic gait and aphasia.
Footprint peak time and functional ambulation profile reflect the potential for hemiparetic gait recovery.
Macko R, DeSouza C, Tretter L, Silver K, Smith G, Anderson P, Tomoyasu N, Gorman P, Dengel D (1997) Treadmill aerobic exercise training reduces the energy expenditure and cardiovascular demands of hemiparetic gait in chronic stroke patients.
The patient continued to ambulate with a slightly hemiparetic gait pattern but advanced each leg independently in a reciprocal fashion.
An examination of constraints affecting the intralimb coordination of hemiparetic gait.
5- to 2-fold elevated energy requirements for hemiparetic gait (Macko et al.
Macko RF, De Souza CA, Trett LD, Silver KH, Smith GV, Anderson PA, Tomoyasu N, Gorman P, Dengel DR (1997) Treadmill aerobic exercise training reduces the energy expenditure and cardiovascular demands of hemiparetic gait in chronic stroke patients.
Both stride length and cadence in individuals with a stroke are decreased relative to those parameters in normal individuals resulting in the decreased gait speed associated with hemiparetic gait (11, 13).
Results: At enrollment, 85 subjects had neurologic gait abnormalities of the following types: unsteady gait (in 31 subjects), frontal gait (in 12 subjects), hemiparetic gait (in 11 subjects), neuropathic gait (in 10 subjects), parkinsonian gait (in eight subjects), and spastic gait (in two subjects).
Macko R, DeSouza C, Tretter L, Silver K, Smith G, Anderson P, Tomoyasu N, Gorman P and Dengel D (1997): Treadmill aerobic exercise training reduces the energy expenditure and cardiovascular demands of hemiparetic gait in chronic stroke patients.
Inclusion criteria were (1) index stroke >3 mo prior in women or men aged 21 to 85 yr; (2) residual hemiparetic gait deficits, with observable asymmetry [48]; (3) completion of all conventional physical therapy; (4) adequate language and neurocognitive function to participate in testing and training and to give informed consent; and (5) paretic DF manual muscle test score of >2 of 5, gravity neutral.