hemiparasite


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hemiparasite

(hĕm′ĭ-păr′ə-sīt′)
n.
A plant, such as mistletoe, that obtains some nourishment from its host but also photosynthesizes. Also called semiparasite.

hem′i·par′a·sit′ic (-sĭt′ĭk) adj.

hemiparasite

an organism that derives part of its sustenance from other organisms.
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References in periodicals archive ?
All known Castilleja species are hemiparasites capable of utilizing broad range of hosts, yet nothing is known about the host(s) of C.
Growth, gas exchange and water use efficiency of the facultative hemiparasite Rhinanthus minor associated with hosts differing in foliar nitrogen concentration.
For Triphysaria seedlings, there may be a premium on quickly finding a host, especially given that many hemiparasites remain small and vegetative until successfully attaching to a host (Wilkins 1963, Yeo 1964, Snogerup 1982; M.
The population biology of annual grassland hemiparasites.
Transfer of pyrrolizidine and quinolizidine alkaloids to Castilleja (Scrophulariaceae) hemiparasites from composite and legume host plants.
Probably the autotrophic production of carbon by the hemiparasite itself is not sufficient for normal production of flowers.
Attachment to a host is necessary for most root hemiparasites for normal growth and reproduction (e.
Only 25 species of epiphytes and 11 species of hemiparasites were reported (Table 2; Fig.
When a different life-form was reported for a species, we translated it back to Raunkiaer's original system: aerophytes, epiphytes and hemiparasites were considered phanerophytes; cacti and succulent plants were considered phanerophytes or chamaephytes, depending on the size of the adult plant; climbers were reclassified as phanerophytes, chamaephytes, or therophytes, depending on their ability to survive the dry season.
Phoradendron juniperinum are autotrophic hemiparasites (Kuijt 1969; Calder and Bernhardt 1983; Lei 1999), but must acquire water and mineral nutrients from its J.
Confusion is introduced by statements that Cuscuta and Cassytha are holoparasites when, in fact, only some species of dodder are holoparasitic and all species of Cassytha are hemiparasites.
These include applying these methods to plants with different morphologies and life spans, the lack of suitable methods that can be used to screen large number of plants for some types of measurements, and the problem of dealing with mutualistic associations such as mycorrhizae, epiphytes, and hemiparasites.