hematocele


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hematocele

 [he´mah-to-sēl″]
an effusion of blood into a cavity, especially into the tunica vaginalis testis.

he·ma·to·cele

(hē'mă-tō-sēl', hem'ă-),
1. Synonym(s): hemorrhagic cyst
2. Effusion of blood into a canal or a cavity of the body.
3. Swelling due to effusion of blood into the tunica vaginalis testis.
[hemato- + G. kēlē, tumor]

hematocele

/he·ma·to·cele/ (he´mah-to-) (hem´ah-to-sēl″) an effusion of blood into a cavity, especially into the tunica vaginalis testis.
parametric hematocele , pelvic hematocele, retrouterine hematocele a swelling formed by effusion of blood into the pouch of Douglas.

hematocele

[hem′ətōsēl′]
a cystlike accumulation of blood within the tunica vaginalis of the scrotum. It is usually caused by injury and may require surgery if the blood is not readily resorbed. Also spelled haematocele.

hematocele

Urology Pooled blood in the scrotum. Cf Spermatocele.

he·ma·to·cele

(hē'mă-tō-sēl)
1. Synonym(s): hemorrhagic cyst, haematocele.
2. Effusion of blood into a canal or a cavity of the body.
3. Swelling due to effusion of blood into the tunica vaginalis testis.
Synonym(s): haematocele.
[hemato- + G. kēlē, tumor]

hematocele

an effusion of blood into a cavity, especially into the tunica vaginalis testis.
References in periodicals archive ?
In our patient, the etiology of the hematocele was unknown, in the absence of predisposing conditions or previous trauma.
This managements avoids testicular compression and prevents epididymo-orchitis abscess formation and necrosis, as unresorbed hematocele can eventually become infected.
The differential diagnosis of a firm, painless scrotal mass should include the possibility of a rare chronic hematocele, even in absence of trauma.
6,8) In the case reported here, color Doppler showed vessels within the septae, a finding that would not be expected in an organized pyocele or hematocele, which may otherwise have a similar sonographic appearance.
Other findings include irregular, poorly defined borders, scrotal wall thickening, and hematocele (Figure 11).
6) Hematoceles and pyoceles are rare and are usually caused by trauma, surgery, or neoplasm.
2) Either injury can result in hematoceles that eventually transform into post-traumatic hydroceles.