hematemesis


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hematemesis

 [he″mah-tem´ĕ-sis]
the vomiting of blood. The appearance of the vomit depends on the amount and character of the gastric contents at the time blood is vomited and on the length of time the blood has been in the stomach. Gastric acids change bright red blood to a brownish color and the vomit is often described as “coffee-ground” in color. Bright red blood in the vomit indicates a fresh hemorrhage and little contact of the blood with gastric juices. The most common causes of hematemesis are peptic ulcer, gastritis, esophageal varices or lesions, and cancer of the stomach. Benign tumors, traumatic postoperative bleeding, and swallowed blood from points in the nose, mouth, and throat can also produce hematemesis.

he·ma·tem·e·sis

(hē'mă-tem'ĕ-sis, hem-ă-),
Vomiting of blood.
Synonym(s): vomitus cruentes
[hemat- + G. emesis, vomiting]

hematemesis

/he·ma·tem·e·sis/ (he″mah-tem´ĕ-sis) the vomiting of blood.

hematemesis

[hē′mətem′əsis, hem′-]
Etymology: Gk, haima + emesis, vomiting
vomiting of bright red blood, indicating rapid upper GI bleeding, commonly associated with esophageal varices or peptic ulcer. The rate and the source of bleeding are determined by endoscopic examination. Any blood found in the stomach is removed by nasogastric suction. Treatment requires replacement of blood by transfusion, administration of IV fluids for maintenance of fluid and electrolyte balance, and possible gastric lavage. Surgery may be necessary. The patient is usually very anxious and needs quiet, warmth, and reassurance. Also spelled haematemesis. See also gastrointestinal bleeding.

hematemesis

Spitting up blood Medtalk The passage of blood from the mouth, most often due to ruptured esophageal varices

he·ma·tem·e·sis

(hē'mă-tem'ĕ-sis)
Vomiting blood.
Synonym(s): haematemesis.
[hemat- + G. emesis, vomiting]

hematemesis (hem··t·mēˑ·sis),

n the oral expulsion of blood; indicative of peptic ulcer, esophageal varices, or other conditions.

he·ma·tem·e·sis

(hē'mă-tem'ĕ-sis)
Vomiting of blood.
Synonym(s): haematemesis.
[hemat- + G. emesis, vomiting]

hematemesis (hē´mətem´esis),

n vomiting of blood.

hematemesis

the vomiting of blood. The appearance of the vomitus depends on the amount and character of the gastric contents at the time blood is vomited and on the length of time the blood has been in the stomach. Gastric acids change bright red blood to a brownish color and the vomitus is often described as 'coffee-ground' in color. Bright red blood in the vomitus indicates a fresh hemorrhage and little contact of the blood with gastric juices.

Patient discussion about hematemesis

Q. Why do alcoholics spew blood? I saw someone vomiting blood and my brother said it is because he’s an alcoholic but couldn’t explain why…

A. Alcohol affects many different things in the body. This sounds very serious and he probably needs immediate medical attention. When your body is trying to process something that is harming it at the same time, many things are going on and being destroyed.

More discussions about hematemesis
References in periodicals archive ?
During course of illness it can be complicated with cholecystitis and erosive gastritis, the cause for hematemesis in our case.
The most common presenting symptoms are hematemesis in acute bleed and melena in chronic cases1.
The patient's condition continued to worsen, and she experienced hematemesis and vaginal bleeding.
The trend in primary care is toward empiric treatment to control symptoms, and away from a strict diagnosis in patients who have no alarm symptoms such as hematemesis.
Thompson reviewed a series of 156 patients with hematemesis and melena seen at the St.
On the second postoperative day, the patient experienced severe hematemesis, which was controlled by lavage with iced saline through a nasogastric tube.
2% were, in decreasing order of frequency: thrombosis, hypotension, leg edema, fever, decreased hemoglobin, hematuria, dizziness, epistaxis, vomiting, impaired healing, cerebrovascular disorder, leg pain, and hematemesis.
There was no malena, hematemesis or history of previous surgeries.
Gastric duplications usually present early with complaints of poor feeding, failure to grow, vomiting, hematemesis and malena12.
On the 8th day of life, she had hematemesis, melena, bleeding at venipuncture sites, hypoglycemia, and oliguria.