helicy

helicy

 [he´lĭ-se]
a principle of homeodynamics in the science of unitary human beings; the continuous, innovative, and unpredictable increasing diversity of human and environmental field patterns.

helicy (hēˑ·l·sē),

n a continuously mixing and rotating property of environmental and human energy fields.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Theories have been derived from Rogers' postulates of energy fields, pattern, openness, pandimensionality, and principles of resonancy, helicy, and integrality for the purpose of guiding research and practice.
Helicy refers to "the continuous, innovative process within the human-environmental field pattern, manifested as movement toward one's potential, and is positively associated with a sense of well-being even in the presence of illness or other challenging life experiences" (Rogers, 1992, p.
Rogers' principles of helicy, resonancy, and integrality became easier to grasp when applied to patient assessment using the picture scale.
The principle of helicy shows continuous, innovative, increasing diversity in the changing universe pattern that is unpredictable.
Her four principles, reciprocy, synchrony, helicy, and resonancy, were later modified to three.
The concept of environment is a patterned, pandimensional energy field where health is seen as an expression of the life process and the goal of nursing is to facilitate well being through intentional mutual patterning including environmental patterning to promote helicy, integrality and resonancy (Fawcett, 1993).
The principle of helicy is defined as "the continuous, innovative, unpredictable increasing diversity of human and environmental field patterns.
Finally, the principle of helicy is defined as "the continuous,
2005) the conceptualization of well-being that guided the development of the WPS is the nature of the homeodynamic principles of helicy, resonancy, and integrality that manifest as pattern.
Helicy, referring to the human process of self-organization, diversity and innovative change, is evident in the women's acknowledgement of a changing body and their ability to recognize they could not stop change but they could purposefully participate in the changes occurring in their body and their environment.
The principle of helicy within Rogers' Science of Unitary Human Beings (SUHB) describes the nature of the change process as being continuously innovative.
Rogers' (1970) evolutionary ideas about the nature of change expressed in the postulates of helicy and resonancy, as well as her theory of accelerating evolution were clearly influenced by Teilhard de Chardin.