inheritance

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inheritance

 [in-her´ĭ-tans]
1. the acquisition of characters or qualities by transmission from parent to offspring.
2. that which is transmitted from parent to offspring; see also gene, deoxyribonucleic acid, and heredity.
intermediate inheritance inheritance in which the phenotype of the heterozygote falls between that of the two homozygotes.
maternal inheritance the transmission of characters that are dependent on peculiarities of the egg cytoplasm produced, in turn, by nuclear genes.

in·her·i·tance

(in-her'i-tans),
1. Characters or qualities that are transmitted from parent to offspring by coded cytologic data; that which is inherited.
2. Cultural or legal endowment.
3. The act of inheriting.
[L. heredito, inherit, fr. heres (hered-), an heir]

inheritance

/in·her·i·tance/ (in-her´ĭ-tans)
1. the acquisition of characters or qualities by transmission from parent to offspring.
2. that which is transmitted from parent to offspring.

cytoplasmic inheritance  mitochondrial i.
dominant inheritance  see under gene.
extrachromosomal inheritance  mitochondrial i.
intermediate inheritance  inheritance in which the phenotype of the heterozygote falls between that of either homozygote.
maternal inheritance  mitochondrial i.
mitochondrial inheritance  the inheritance of traits controlled by genes on the DNA of mitochondria in the ooplasm; thus the genes are inherited entirely from the maternal side, segregate randomly at meiosis or mitosis, and are variably expressed.
recessive inheritance  see under gene.
sex-linked inheritance  see under gene.

inheritance

(ĭn-hĕr′ĭ-təns)
n.
1.
a. The action of inheriting something: the inheritance of property from a relative.
b. Something inherited or to be inherited: Her inheritance included a large estate.
2. Something regarded as a heritage: the cultural inheritance of Rome.
3. Biology
a. The process of genetic transmission of characteristics from parent or ancestor to offspring.
b. A characteristic so inherited.
c. The sum of genetically transmitted characteristics.

inheritance

[inher′itəns]
Etymology: L, in, within, hereditare, to inherit
1 the acquisition or expression of traits or conditions by transmission of genetic material from parents to offspring.

in·her·i·tance

(in-her'i-tăns)
1. Characters or qualities that are transmitted from parent to offspring by coded cytologic data; that which is inherited.
2. Cultural or legal endowment.
3. The act of inheriting.
[L. heredito, inherit, fr. heres (hered-), an heir]

inheritance

1. The acquisition of a particular set of genes (GENOME) from the entire series of a person's forebears, by way of an equal number of genes from each parent.
2. The characteristics transmitted in this way.

inheritance

  1. the acquisition of characteristics by the transfer of genetic material from ancestor to descendant.
  2. the total of characters in the fertilized ovum.

inheritance

The acquisition of traits, characteristics and disorders from parents to their children by transmission of genetic information. Genes come in pairs: one originating from the father, the other from the mother. If an individual presents only the hereditary characteristics determined by one gene of the pair on an autosomal chromosome, that gene is called dominant. Conditions caused by such genes are said to show autosomal dominant inheritance. For instance, for a rare autosomal dominant disease, if one parent is affected, then on average about 50% of their children will also be affected, irrespective of the children's sex. Examples: Marfan's syndrome, congenital stationary night blindness, neurofibromatosis 1 and 2, von Hippel-Lindau disease. If the individual does not present the hereditary characteristics unless both genes in a pair are of the same type, then the gene is called recessive. Conditions caused by such genes are said to show autosomal recessive inheritance. For a rare autosomal recessive disease, if a child is affected, then on average about 25% of their siblings will also be affected, irrespective of their sex. Examples: Laurence-Moon-Biedl syndrome, Tay-Sachs disease, oculocutaneous albinism, galactokinase deficiency.Thirdly, inheritance may be controlled by genes on one of the sex chromosomes, most often the X chromosome. A recessive mutation on the single X chromosome carried by a male will cause a disease, whereas in the female, a recessive X chromosome mutation would have to be carried on both of her X chromosomes. Therefore in X-linked recessive inheritance (sex-linked recessive inheritance) males are affected more often than females. Examples: colour blindness, ocular albinism, choroideremia. A fourth type of inheritance considered in ophthalmic practice is mitochondrial (maternal) inheritance in which the inheritance of a trait encoded in the mitochondrial DNA is transmitted through the female line (mother to son or mother to daughter). Examples: Leber's hereditary optic atrophy; Kearns-Sayre syndrome. See acquired; chromosome; defective colour vision; gene; hereditary.
Table I5 Divisions of the infrared spectrum
IR-A (near)780-1400 nm
IR-B (middle)1400-3000 nm
IR-C (far)3000-1 000 000 nm

inheritance

1. the acquisition of characters or qualities by transmission from parent to offspring.
2. that which is transmitted from parent to offspring. See also gene, deoxyribonucleic acid and heredity.
Mendelian inheritance is the basis of all genetic practice, but it has limitations in explaining the small differences that occur in a range of offspring of similar and related matings. Galtonian genetics deals specifically with this problem and is better fitted as a tool in population genetics and in dealing with characters that are dependent on a number of chromosomal loci rather than on a single locus.

autosomal inheritance
controlled by genes located on autosomes.
intermediate inheritance
inheritance in which the phenotype of the heterozygote falls between that of either homozygote.
maternal inheritance
the transmission of characters that are dependent on peculiarities of the egg cytoplasm produced, in turn, by nuclear genes.
X-linked inheritance

Patient discussion about inheritance

Q. Is Autism hereditary? My 3 year old son has been diagnosed with autism last year. I am now pregnant with my second child and am scared that he will too have autism.

A. There is a higher chance that your additional children will have autism too, however its not a given. Be more alert and notice any early signs that your child may develop.

Q. Is Leukemia hereditary? My Grandpa died of Leukemia when he was 50. I am worried that it might be hereditary. Is it?

A. Overall leukemia is not hereditary but there are rare reports of family clusters, that is, more than one case in a family. Therefore, you should consult your Doctor and tell him about your family's medical history.

Q. Is migraine hereditary? If both my parents suffer from migraines does it mean I can't avoid it?

A. Yes, migraines do have a very strong genetic correlation. However, it does not mean that if both your parents have it, you will have it too for 100%. It means only that you have a much higher risk than the regular population, that does not have migraines in their family, to suffer from this condition.

More discussions about inheritance
References in periodicals archive ?
As meritocratic competition has expanded upwards, undermining the sheltered workshops that once gave rich kids outlets for their energies, the mentality of these heirs has changed.
Second, the heirs can register the inherited plots under a family property partnership in the land registry offices.
Charles became heir apparent on the death of his grandfather George VI, when his mother succeeded to the throne on February 6 1952.
Britain's Heir Apparent toured the exhibition and was briefed on it.
And he added that the programme has encouraged many viewers to want to try their hand at the heir hunting game.
The ban on a Catholic being King or Queen will not be axed, meaning an heir raised as a Catholic, could be barred from becoming monarch.
HH the Heir Apparent toured the exhibition, which is organised by a number of government and semi-government ministries and private sectors, and listened to a detailed explanation about the plans and visions for the application of the exhibition's objectives which will help the Qatari youth to implement their own projects.
As has often been noted, the Folio's spelling of "hair" activates an apt play on words: if Macbeth's thoughts make his hair stand on end, it is because they bear on heirs, Banquo's if not his own; "unfixe my Heire" even suggests that the prophecy has disabled in advance any dynastic aspirations Macbeth might have had, though since "unfixing" here means something like "causing to stand on end," it may also suggest, conversely, the animation of the heir.
He became the heir apparent when he was three years old upon the accession to the throne by his mother on Feb.
If one or more of these documents are unavailable, an order instructing National Bonds to issue the final redemption cheque to the court or any legal heir appointed by the court will also suffice.
Heir who, while practicing oral and maxillofacial surgery, saw the need for cosmetic expertise and surgery.
In Roman law the partible inheritance was considered a pars bonorum and not a pars hereditatis, the heir who is entitled to a portion of an inheritance can choose the partible inheritance even if he renounces to the inheritance.