heaves


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Related to heaves: dry heaves

heaves

(hēvz),
A condition of horses similar to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (e.g., farmer's lung) or airway hypersensitivity (hyperreactivity) syndrome associated with asthma-type conditions in humans; horse serves as a research model. Characterized by inflammation and reduced airway elasticity around the bronchioles and alveoli; and accumulation of inspissated exudates in the small airways, with bronchiectasis, bronchospasms, smooth muscle hypertrophy and fibrosis. It reduces pulmonary function. Clinical signs include coughing, bronchitis, bronchiolitis, reduces exercise tolerance, and expiratory dyspnea that, in chronic cases, leads to a heave line on the musculature located superficially on the caudovental aspect of the abdomen.
Synonym(s): broken wind

heaves

[hēvz]
Etymology: AS, hebban, to lift
1 a chronic pulmonary disease, similar to human pulmonary emphysema, characterized by wheezing, coughing, and dyspnea on exertion. The cause of the condition is unknown.
2
Usage notes: (informal)
vomiting and retching.

heaves

see chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

heaves line
the visible groove between the aponeurotic and muscular parts of the external oblique muscle caused by the persistent double expiratory effort, with maximum abdominal muscle input, imposed by the poor respiratory gas exchange in this disease.
Enlarge picture
Heave line in a horse with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. By permission from Knottenbelt DC, Pascoe RR, Diseases and Disorders of the Horse, Saunders, 2003
References in classic literature ?
You needn't heave in the dories till after dinner," said Troop, from the deck.
I was all in, but I gave that heave right O--and then it was, 'Another heave now, Mr.
I'll be blessed if he didn't make those poor niggers heave at every rope on the pin-rails before he found the halyards.
We lowered sail, picked up one end of the net, and began to heave it into the boat.
In the second dog-watch the sailors come on deck, stripped, and heave buckets of water upon one another from overside.