heat1

heat1

energy that raises the temperature of a body or substance; also, the rise of the temperature itself. Heat is associated with molecular motion, and is generated in various ways, including combustion, friction, chemical action and radiation. The total absence of heat is absolute zero, at which all molecular activity ceases.

heat1 balance
balance between heat loss and heat production; its maintenance is critical to the patient's survival.
heat1 bumps
heat1 exhaustion
a disorder resulting from overexposure to heat or to the sun. Long exposure to extreme heat or too much activity under a hot sun causes excessive sweating which removes large quantities of salt and fluid from the body. When the amount of salt and fluid in the body falls too far below normal, heat exhaustion may result. The same disease in birds is called heat prostration (below). See also heat stroke (below).
heat1 increment
see specific dynamic action.
latent heat1
the heat that a body may absorb without changing its temperature.
heat1 loss
body heat can be lost by conduction, convection, evaporation and radiation; evaporation is the critical one during exercise and in hot environments.
heat1 prostration
caused by exposure to high ambient temperature, especially if the humidity causes hyperthermia in birds. This is exacerbated by their poor heat loss mechanisms.
heat1 regulation
is one of the functions of the hypothalamus and consists of a balancing of the body's heat loss and heat gain by regulation of respiration, skin temperature, sweating and muscle tone.
heat1 shock proteins
proteins expressed by heat shock (hsp) genes as a result of exposure to increased temperature or other stress. See also heat shock response (below).
heat1 shock response
decreased transcription and translation activity caused by the synthesis of heat shock proteins by an organism as a result of exposure to increased temperatures or other stress.
specific heat1
the number of calories required to raise the temperature of 1 g of a particular substance one degree centigrade.
heat1 stress
exposure of the animal to high ambient temperatures.
heat1 stroke
elevation of body temperature above physiologically active levels due to the production of excessive heat, exposure to excessive ambient temperatures or failure to lose heat. Characterized by restlessness, followed by dullness, weakness and recumbency. There is severe hyperthermia, the animal seeks cool places, is dyspneic and lapses into a coma terminally.
heat1 teratogenicity
is observed only in experimental application of high temperatures in early pregnancy. Observed defects are of the central nervous system, and of the limbs including arthrogryposis and selective shortening.
heat1 therapy
heat1 tolerance
in animals is their ability to function well under high environmental temperatures. This capacity varies widely between species and breeds. Much of the difference is due to variations in the capacity to increase heat loss under conditions of heat stress.
heat1 weaning
the weaning of commercial chickens away from an artificial heat source at about 4 weeks of age.
References in periodicals archive ?
And these tests can uncover reasons for infertility that may be easily treatable, such as low sperm counts due to excessive heat1 or to diabetes.
Ladbrokes Midland Champion Hurdle - Heat betting from sponsors Ladbrokes: Heat1 8.