heat-related death


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heat-related death

Forensic medicine A death with a core body temperature ≥ 40.6ºC/105ºF with no other reasonable explanation of death At-risk groups Elderly, those living alone, alcoholics. See Heat wave.
References in periodicals archive ?
temperature-related deaths found that for heat-related deaths, exposure to heat was the most frequently cited underlying cause of death on the death certificates, followed by heart disease and unintentional injuries.
TABLE 1 Summary of 2012 Alabama Heat-Related Deaths and Illnesses Category # Heat-related deaths 6 Other 1 (Blank) 5 Heat-related illnesses 809 Athletic related 104 Other 358 Work related 347 Total 815 TABLE 2 Management Occupation Title From 2002 Census 2002 2002 Assigned Assigned Occupational Census SOC (a) Activity MET Classification System Code Code Codes Values Fire fighters 3740 33-2011 12 5.
For heat-related deaths during the heat wave, 93 occurred in the community (88%) and 13 occurred in long-term health care facilities and hospitals (12%).
20,27,28) An extension of air conditioning was accompanied by the virtual disappearance of heat-related death in North Carolina, despite summers becoming hotter.
Findings from this work are relevant for guiding such efforts to prevent heat-related deaths, including urban planning measures, public messaging during heat waves, and provision of air conditioners and electric power subsidies.
EHE days occur when a location's temperature, dew point temperature cloud cover, wind speed and surface atmospheric pressure throughout the day combine to cause or contribute to heat-related deaths in that location.
Most heat-related deaths occur in cities (Kovats and Koppe 2005), and this trend is likely to continue for several socio-environmental reasons: a) Cities in many types of climate regimes experience heat waves (Anderson and Bell 2011); b) cities, especially in developing nations of Asia and Africa, are growing rapidly (United Nations Population Fund 2007); c) large numbers of vulnerable populations, such as the poor, homeless, and elderly, reside in cities; and d) cities are warmer than surrounding rural areas because of the urban heat island effect (Heisler and Brazel 2010).
The more novel finding of this study is that the risk of heat-related death in the summer was higher when we classified the preceding wintertime mortality burden as low versus high.
A modest increase in risk of heat-related death was observed for those making less than versus more than $10,000 during the 1999 Chicago heat wave (Naughton et al.
Charges of Involuntary Manslaughter against the Detroit nursing home, its medical director/co-owner, and director of nursing were originally filed on April 21, 2003, following an investigation into the heat-related death of a 78-year-old tube-fed female resident.
The media attention surrounding the heat-related death of 27-year-old Minnesota Viking Korey Stringer last year during football practice forced coaches to become more alert during practice, looking out for signs of heat-related illnesses.
Regardless of the heat, local high schools kicked off their training, keeping in mind the heat-related death earlier this summer of Minnesota Vikings tackle Korey Stringer.