heartwater

heartwater

(hart'wah'tĕr),
A serious septicemic tropical disease caused by a rickettsial agent; geographic distribution primarily sub-Saharan Africa. The causative agent, Cowdria (Rickettsia ruminantium) is transferred by the bont ticks Amblyomma hebraeum and A. variegatumo affecting ruminants (bovine, caprine, and ovine, including antelope); peracute presentation consists of high fever and convulsions; acute cases present with neurologic signs and diarrhea; chronic cases are variable in presentation and signs may include pleural and pericardial effusion.

heartwater

a disease of cattle, sheep, goats and wild ungulates caused by Ehrlichia ruminantium (previously called Cowdria ruminantium), transmitted by the Amblyomma spp. ticks. In domestic animals it causes high fever and sudden death, or a less acute form manifested by incoordination, circling, blind charging, convulsions and death from encephalitis.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Tswana is also known to have resistance to the endemic heartwater disease, as do Landim cattle (South African sanga) from Mozambique (Asselbergs et al.
These tick-borne diseases include, but are not limited to, heartwater disease (Ehrlichia ruminantium) transmitted by Amblyomma hebraeum (bont tick); red water disease (Babesia bigemina) transmitted by Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) decoloratus (blue tick); and East coast fever (Theileria parva parva) and corridor disease (Theileria parva lawrencei) transmitted by Rhipicephalus appendiculatus (brown ear tick).
Scientists from academia, industry, and government agencies in North America and Europe review the current status of vaccines and diagnostics for high priority transboundary animal diseases, decision-making and regulatory processes for veterinary biologics, translating research findings into licensed novel vaccines and diagnostics, and the roles and responsibilities of government agencies, as well as achievements and gaps in vaccine and diagnostics development for 11 diseases: highly pathogenic avian influenza, exotic Newcastle disease, foot and mouth disease, Rift Valley fever, Nipah and Hendra virus, African swine fever, classical swine fever, heartwater, Q fever, Ebola, and Schmallenberg virus.
Heartwater disease causes an acute high lever, loss of appetite, and respiratory distress.
Comparison of efficacy of American and African Amblyomma ticks as vectors of heartwater (Cowdria ruminantium) infection by molecular analyses and transmission trials.
The tick is a pest of economic and pathogenic concern since it readily infests cattle (Semtner & Hair 1973), and is the vector of Cowdria ruminantium Cowdry (the causative agent of Heartwater disease) (Uilenburg 1982) and Rickettsia parkeri (the causative agent of newly described spotted fever) (Paddock et al.
maculatum populations as a model for the movement of the foreign animal disease, heartwater, in the event of an accidental or intentional introduction to the United States.
It is claimed that African tortoises harbour a deadly tick that can infect cattle, sheep and deer with the killer heartwater disease.
These species are carriers of heartwater, a highly lethal disease in cattle, deer, sheep, and goats.
The southern African bont tick, which produces a deadly malady in cattle known as heartwater disease, prefers animals tested out by its peers, according to a study conducted in Zimbabwe and reported in the Jan.
The heartwater pathogen, a microbe that can cause heart and pulmonary edema, and carried by the tropical bont tick, can kill deer, cattle or other wildlife, and potentially be transmitted to humans.
The farmers in the current study were concerned about the transmission of heartwater, redwater and gall sickness and similar findings in the Eastern Cape Province were highlighted by Mapiye et al.