health care-associated infection

health care-associated infection

an infection acquired in a health care-related setting other than a hospital (for example, dialysis facility, provider of long-term care).

health care-as·so·ci·a·ted in·fec·tion

(helth kār-ă-sōsē-ā-tĕd in-fekshŭn)
Infection acquired in a health care-related setting other than a hospital (e.g., dialysis facility, provider of long-term care).
See also: nosocomial
References in periodicals archive ?
Health Care-Associated Infection Outbreak Investigations in Outpatient Settings, Los Angeles County, California, USA, 2000-2012
There may be parts of your procedure that can be cut back to reduce your chances of contracting a health care-associated infection.
Pooled mean percentage of tested isolates of six urgent or serious antibiotic-resistant threat pathogens that were antibiotic -resistant, by type of health care facility and type of health care -associated infection reported--National Healthcare Safety Network, United States, 2008-2014 * Health care-associated infection type CLABSI CAUTI No.
Being in hospital does carry risks, for example, frail patients are at risk of getting a health care-associated infection, or DVTs (blood clots).
CDC/NHSN surveillance definition of health care-associated infection and criteria for specific types of infections in the acute care setting.
Of every 100 hospitalized patients, at least seven in developed and 10 in developing countries will acquire a health care-associated infection.
The second domain includes two health care-associated infection measures: central line-associated bloodstream infection and catheter-associated urinary tract infection.
The HQSC's IPC programme aims to reduce the risk of health care-associated infection through a range of strategies across the health sector.
Nurse staffing, burnout, and health care-associated infection.
In a study of 100,000 Medicare patients hospitalized in 3,648 hospitals, researchers found Blacks had a higher risk than Whites of suffering from a health care-associated infection or adverse drug event.
They were advised to use the CDCs infection prevention checklist for outpatient settings to assess infection control practices, and adhere to local, state, and federal requirements on health care-associated infection surveillance, reportable diseases, and outbreak reporting.

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