headrest

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headrest

(hed'rest)
1. A pad made of soft material placed beneath the occiput, around the neck or lower face or both, designed to limit head movement during surgery or to prevent neck pain in cervical arthritis.
2. A padded device used in cars, airplanes, or boats to prevent neck trauma during accidents.
3. A padded device used in some types of wheelchairs to support the head and neck of patients with flaccid muscles or other neurological conditions. See: assistive technology
References in periodicals archive ?
Furthermore, only 6% of people adjust the head restraint regularly, despite the fact they may travel in different vehicles.
Effective protection is provided by active head restraints.
Miner points out that not only is this head restraint easy to assemble--snapping together--but there can be ready customization in the trim and final shop of the OEM.
When getting in a car, whether as the driver or passenger, you should adjust your head restraint correctly to mitigate any potential injury.
They found that the presence of the head restraint significantly reduced the predicted injury risk.
Good seat design is not something that should be inherently linked to higher value cars and this latest set of results will hopefully act as a catalyst for vehicle manufacturers to look at improving seat and head restraints design within this important and growing sector.
For weaker impacts, the volunteers either did not find that their head was forced back into the head restraint or the force was so minor that they barely noticed it.
All four vehicles are equipped with the company's active head restraint system for front-seat occupants.
As the first head restraint, the HANS Device has a long history of success and technical breakthroughs.
The NHTSA found that the vehicle's rear seat head restraints may not lock in the upright position after being folded forward, and are therefore not compliant with federal regulations.
The functional principle of the riACT head restraints is as follows: regardless of the selected initial head restraint position, the head restraint moves so close to the back of the head during a rear-end collision that the relative backward displacement of the head and the subsequent whiplash movement are prevented or strongly reduced.
AA president Edmund King, says: "Drivers and passengers can help prevent themselves becoming victims of whiplash by adjusting head restraints before they drive off.