haze

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haze

In ophthalmology, a clouding of vision that makes viewed objects appear smoky or indistinct. Opacification of the cornea is the cause.
References in periodicals archive ?
The vagueness of Wright's language here appropriately reflects the haziness of Jake's desires.
CATARACTS are caused by haziness developing in the lens, rather like a car windscreen steaming up on a frosty morning.
It argues that, in spite of the recently acknowledged importance of transparency (particularly in some inflation-targeting countries), there is substantial haziness about the economic models used by CBs to generate forecasts as well as about their objective function.
Each hypothesis must be clearly stated, free from vagueness and haziness.
The additional haziness generated when defining terms such as peace enforcement and peacekeeping has intensified the debate about what is happening to the world order and whether we are experiencing an enduring normative shift in the foundation of international relations.
The very thin coating is said to offer high elasticity and perfect clarity with no haziness.
Haziness also afflicts attempts to decipher dreams with recordings of brain activity, remarks neuroscientist Allen Braun of the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Md.
The fronts are vast, and the haziness of the context in which we are moving does not make understanding easier.
Inness also painted the warm, dusty haziness of summer evenings where, once again, details of trees and hills blended together.
The use of COC in FE blends also enhances the moisture barrier and does not significantly change haziness or other film properties.
The movie merely exhibits Brady's genial haziness, and the joke turns sour after the dead dog is left in Leer's bed in his parents' home after Grady and Crabtree -- having discovered the young writer's brilliance -- take him away.
Milosz was critical of the Polish romantic tradition, with its verbosity, excessive emotionality, and intellectual haziness, as well as of avant-garde poetics, which turned poetry into a sort of "puzzle" and "made of the poet a creature with a head covered by mathematical knobs and excessively large eye lenses, with a simultaneous atrophy of heart and liver" (K, 68).