hazardous waste


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hazardous waste

n.
Waste material, such as nuclear waste or an industrial byproduct, that is potentially damaging to the environment and harmful to humans and other organisms.

hazardous waste

Occupational health Any unwanted waste product that poses a hazard or potential hazard to human health, which may be generated by a manufacturing process–eg, radioactive gas cylinders, chemicals, pesticides, acids, and liquid or by a health care facility, including regulated biohazardous waste. See Regulated waste, Toxic dump.

haz·ar·dous waste

(hazărd-ŭs wāst)
Debris, trash, or byproducts from dental procedures that pose a risk.
References in periodicals archive ?
Most industries used the opportunity [presented by the delay in constructing disposal sites] to discharge their hazardous waste in illegal dump sites outside industrial estates, along roadsides, in low-lying areas, along with municipal wastes, or even in river and canal pits," observed the 2001 HPC report.
For other items, hazardous waste arises at the end of their lives, such as car oil and CFCs.
The first milestone, on July 16, will see the banning of disposal of hazardous wastes with other types of waste in the same landfill as well as treatment standards for hazardous wastes prior to disposal.
The site is an arduous 12-hour truck ride from the Mexico City region, where more than half of the country's hazardous waste is produced.
Identifying hazardous waste is the responsibility of all who handle, transport, process, and dispose of waste.
During and after the cleanup and treatment, the company will continue to use the land and operate the plant in the same manner as before the cleanup except that it will dispose of any hazardous waste in compliance with environmental requirements.
He estimates that almost 90 percent of our liquid hazardous waste is being incinerated in cement kilns.
Though hazardous waste may be the more costly to deal with, its definitions and regulations are far clearer.
In the United States, old electronic circuits - in computer parts, semiconductors, and so on - have become a mounting source of hazardous waste.
Another section of SARA requires the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to issue standards for hazardous waste operations and emergency response.
In 1984, Congress amended the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act to emphasize pollution prevention as the way to deal with hazardous waste, with treatment technologies (including incineration) as a secondary method of managing these wastes.
Styrene-containing waste--more specifically, unreacted unsaturated polyester resins--are already listed as hazardous waste because they have a flash point less than 140 F and are thus easily ignitable.

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