hatchet

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hatchet

 [hach´et]
a bibeveled or single beveled cutting dental instrument having its cutting edge in line with the axis of its blade; used for breaking down tooth structures undermined by caries, for smoothing cavity walls, and for sharpening line and point angles.
Hatchet. From Dorland's, 2000.

hatch·et

(hatch'et),
A dental instrument with an end cutting blade set at an angle to the axis of the handle and having one or two bevels; in the former case, made as right and left pairs called enamel hatchets; used for removing enamel and dentin on teeth.

hatchet

[hach′ət]
a bibeveled or single beveled cutting dental hand instrument having its cutting edge in line with the axis of its blade. It is used for breaking down tooth structure undermined by caries, smoothing cavity walls, removing unsupported enamel, and sharpening line and point angles.

hatch·et

(hachĕt)
A dental instrument with an end cutting blade set at an angle to the axis of the handle and having one or two bevels; used to remove enamel and dentin on teeth.

hatch·et

(hachĕt)
Dental instrument with an end cutting blade set at an angle to axis of handle and having one or two bevels; in the former case, made as right and left pairs called enamel hatchets; used to remove enamel and dentin. Also called hatchet excavator.

hatchet,

n an angled cutting hand instrument in which the broad side of the blade is parallel with the angle(s) of the shank. Used to develop internal cavity form. May be bibeveled or single beveled like a chisel, in which case the instrument is paired with another.
References in periodicals archive ?
A pre-match armwrestle in the centre circle might have been a more entertaining way to settle it but let's be grateful for a hatchet at least half buried.
Historical evidence for movement of tools/implements and/or raw materials within and into the Sydney region The eadiest historical records for the Sydney region indicate that material suitable for making ground-edged hatchets was obtained from the Nepean River gravels at the foot of the Blue Mountains eastern escarpment (Collins 179811975]: 487).
Two more hatchets were found in quick succession: Marissa Lanoue, 10, of Athol saw the George Washington hatchet card two minutes later in the bark of a tree, and Landon Guilmette, 6, of Athol captured the Johnny Johnstone hatchet when he found a card under a rock three minutes after Marissa had turned in her card.
This is a plain-Jane version of exactly what an all-around, throw-it-in-the-truck camp axe/hatchet should be, with plenty of meat for the swinging (two pounds, 10 ounces) and just enough hickory (23-inch handle) for the six-inch head to give other hatchets an inferiority complex without being unwieldy.
Pete Carol of ProAdventure said: "We got involved with Gransfors Bruk following our introduction of bushcrafting courses a couple of years ago, when we started importing the company's hatchets.
Hatchets and axes have, technically speaking, nothing to do with farming.
Hatchets are a combination tool, part hammer and part axe.
Jimmy Lackenby, of Gateshead, steps in with this one: "Burying the hatchet originates from the American Indian tradition of burying the hatchets of the chiefs of tribes when they came to a peace agreement.
After 40 years of hunting in antique shops and flea markets, I have found only two broad hatchets that passed muster.
A 62-year-old man was taken to hospital with serious head and back injuries after the attacker - armed with two small axes or hatchets - went on the rampage in Waltham Cross, Hertfordshire.
The bevel on the edge is fairly steep, I imagine to stand up to hard use, but as a man who likes even his hatchets to be shaving sharp, I felt it needed a little more work.
Yes, there the hatchets were, whacked into the wood with a vigor that told you then, and tells you more emphatically now, that Dine was never suited (or bathrobed) for classification in the, to my mind, relatively benign Pop-art category.