Hardy

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Har·dy

(har'dē),
LeGrand H., U.S. ophthalmologist, 1894-1954. See: Hardy-Rand-Ritter test.

Har·dy

(har'dē),
George H., English mathematician, 1877-1947. See: Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, Hardy-Weinberg law.
References in periodicals archive ?
Low-cost practices like water harvesting and storage, using hardier crops, and planting seeds without plowing (to facilitate better moisture retention) would all enable crops to survive short periods of drought.
Under the organic umbrella, Caron is involved with plant breeding, with the intent to produce a hardier potato crop.
But critics question the heavy reliance on the Japanese survivors because of the "healthy survivor" effect--those who survived the bombing might have been hardier than those who died early on, potentially skewing the results.
A few of your hardier plants, such as collards and kale, will actually have improved flavor after being frost-kissed.
This finished sequence will provide an indispensable roadmap to agricultural researchers using both biotechnology and conventional breeding to develop hardier rice varieties.
But you can achieve a similar subsea effect in other areas by experimenting with hardier succulents.
But amid the rubble of her devastated home city, miracles are still possible, and Tia is a hardier survivor than one might expect of a small Siamese
Wildflowers are sprouting in numbers probably not seen in 50 years all around Southern California's deserts and mountains, and even along city streets and in fields where the heavy rain let them compete against hardier immigrant species such as mustard.
Today, the Yasuda fishing company in Saitama, near Tokyo, sells a hardier strain of the Buenos Aires offshoot as exotic sashimi and sushi.
The University of Arkansas System's Division of Agriculture will lead a $5 million, multistate research project aimed at making hardier, more productive rice, Agriculture Secretary Ann M.
Jacqueline Jordan, Hampikian and Cairney are leading a class of Clayton State students to develop hardier seedlings that are more drought and insect resistant.
But since apple orchards may harbor many different replant disease fungi, researchers are testing other biological approaches, including various cultural practices and planting of hardier rootstock.