hard tissue


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hard tis·sue

1. tissue that has become mineralized;
2. tissue having a firm intercellular substance, for example, cartilage and bone.

hard tissue

In dentistry, the term used to denote any of the three calcified tissue components of the tooth: enamel, dentin, and cementum.
See also: tissue
References in periodicals archive ?
10 The most important reason to choose MTA as the permanent repair material in this case is because it has the capacity to promote hard tissue formation and to inhibit osteoclastic bone resorption.
In soft tissue, the amount of displacement of the reflected ultrasound echoes is high, whereas, in hard tissue, amount of displacement is low because soft tissue can be compressed more than hard tissue.
DISCUSSION: The primary aim of pulp capping material is to induce a specific hard tissue formation by pulp cells that seal the exposure site and ultimately contribute to continued pulp vitality.
A review radiograph after 3 years showed repair with hard tissue formation across the fracture (Fig 3d).
These changes may range from denaturation to vaporization and carbonization, and even melting followed by recrystallization in the case of hard tissue.
Debride all hard tissues followed by laser treatment of the soft tissues.
Among specific topics are bone modeling and remodeling, skeletal hard tissue biomechanics, skeletal growth and development, hormonal effects on bone cells, and pharmaceutical treatments of osteoporosis.
Esthetics in implantology; strategies for soft and hard tissue therapy.
A cesium scintillator FPD provides a wide dynamic range of exceptional distortion-free images for soft and hard tissue.
The excellent mechanical properties and inert nature of this material make it desirable for restoring structural integrity to hard tissue that has undergone physical or pathogen-related trauma [1].
They have used these cells to regenerate dentin; cementum, which is the hard tissue on root surfaces; and the periodontal ligament that attaches each tooth to the jaw.
Examining the physical chemical properties of widely used biomaterials and their uses in different clinical fields, the book explores applications including soft and hard tissue replacement; biointeractive metals, polymers, and ceramics; and in vitro, in vivo, and ex vivo biocompatibility tests and clinical trials.