haploid

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haploid

 [hap´loid]
having half the number of chromosomes characteristically found in the somatic (diploid) cells of an organism; typical of the gametes of a species whose union restores the diploid number.

hap·loid

(hap'loyd),
Denoting the number of chromosomes in sperm or ova, which is half the number in somatic (diploid) cells; the haploid number in normal human beings is 23.
Synonym(s): monoploid
[G. haplos, simple, + eidos, appearance]

haploid

/hap·loid/ (hap´loid)
1. having half the number of chromosomes characteristically found in the somatic (diploid) cells of an organism; typical of the gametes of a species whose union restores the diploid number.
2. an individual or cell having only one member of each pair of homologous chromosomes.

haploid

(hăp′loid′)
adj.
Having a single set of unpaired chromosomes, as in a germ cell, such as an egg or sperm, or in a moss plant or a drone bee.
n.
An organism having haploid cells.

haploid

[hap′loid]
Etymology: Gk, haploos, single, eidos, form
having only one complete set of nonhomologous chromosomes. Also monoploid, monoploidic. haploidy, n.

haploid

Genetics adjective Referring to:
1. A normal chromosome complement–expressed as n.
2. A cell with only one copy of each chromosome type–ie, half the number of chromosomes present in other cells; gametes–ie, sperm and ova are haploid. See Chromosome, Diploid, Polypoid, Prokaryote.

hap·loid

(hap'loyd)
Denoting the number of chromosomes in sperm or an oocyte, which is half the number in somatic (diploid) cells; the haploid number in normal human beings is 23.
[G. haplos, simple, + eidos, appearance]

haploid

Having half the number of chromosomes present in a normal body cell. The germ cells, the sperms and eggs (ova) are haploid, so that, on fusion, the full (DIPLOID) number is made up. From the Greek haploeides , single.

haploid

  1. (of a cell nucleus) containing one of each type of chromosome.
  2. a haploid organism in which the main life stage has cell nuclei with one of each type of chromosome, written as ‘n’. Such organisms (e.g. fungi, many algae) usually have a brief DIPLOID (2) phase (2n), returning to the haploid state via MEIOSIS. See ALTERNATION OF GENERATIONS.

haploid,

adj possessing just one set of nonhomologous chromosomes. Also called
monoploid or
monoploidic.

haploid

having half the number of chromosomes characteristically found in the somatic (diploid) cells of an organism; typical of the gametes of a species whose union restores the diploid number.

haploid karyotype
References in periodicals archive ?
In potatoes, haploids derived from tetraploids are commonly called
Resistance responses to Phoma lingum of plants regenerated from selected cell and embryogenic cultures of haploid Brassica napus.
This is the first example of an animal that lives and reproduces mainly in a haploid form.
Intermating of potato haploids and spontaneous sexual polyploidization--effects on heterozygosity.
Agronomic characterization of diploid hybrid families derived from crosses between haploids of the common potato and three wild Argentinean tuber-bearing species.
The main objective of this research was investigation of growth regulators and illumination condition effects on induction and optimum olive conservolea callus and it's evaluation for usable haploid plantlet regeneration in olive breeding program.
Haploid Plantlet Production through Somatic Embryogenesis in Anther-Derived Callus of Bupleurum falcatum.
As opposed to the low frequency reported for wild type maize plants (see above), Kermicle observed a high incidence (up to ~3%) of spontaneous male-derived, androgenic haploids in a mutant inbred line carrying a mutant allele of the indeterminate gametophytel (ig1) gene.
Although it is clear that the genetic material of the androgenic embryo comes from the male parental, it was generally assumed that androgenic haploids originate exclusively from divisions of the sperm nucleus, subsequent to fertilization.
Aneuploids, and undetectable chromosome fragments in haploids, may be an important reason for low viability of gynogens in fish (Thorgaard 1983, Ihssen et al.
The percentage of haploid and subaneuploid (chromosome number less than 16) increased steadily and reached 100% by 50 sec UV irradiation.
Cytogenetic studies on Nicotiana haploids and their bearings to some other cytogenetic problems.