haploid


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Related to haploid: Haploid number

haploid

 [hap´loid]
having half the number of chromosomes characteristically found in the somatic (diploid) cells of an organism; typical of the gametes of a species whose union restores the diploid number.

hap·loid

(hap'loyd),
Denoting the number of chromosomes in sperm or ova, which is half the number in somatic (diploid) cells; the haploid number in normal human beings is 23.
Synonym(s): monoploid
[G. haplos, simple, + eidos, appearance]

haploid

/hap·loid/ (hap´loid)
1. having half the number of chromosomes characteristically found in the somatic (diploid) cells of an organism; typical of the gametes of a species whose union restores the diploid number.
2. an individual or cell having only one member of each pair of homologous chromosomes.

haploid

(hăp′loid′)
adj.
Having a single set of unpaired chromosomes, as in a germ cell, such as an egg or sperm, or in a moss plant or a drone bee.
n.
An organism having haploid cells.

haploid

[hap′loid]
Etymology: Gk, haploos, single, eidos, form
having only one complete set of nonhomologous chromosomes. Also monoploid, monoploidic. haploidy, n.

haploid

Genetics adjective Referring to:
1. A normal chromosome complement–expressed as n.
2. A cell with only one copy of each chromosome type–ie, half the number of chromosomes present in other cells; gametes–ie, sperm and ova are haploid. See Chromosome, Diploid, Polypoid, Prokaryote.

hap·loid

(hap'loyd)
Denoting the number of chromosomes in sperm or an oocyte, which is half the number in somatic (diploid) cells; the haploid number in normal human beings is 23.
[G. haplos, simple, + eidos, appearance]

haploid

Having half the number of chromosomes present in a normal body cell. The germ cells, the sperms and eggs (ova) are haploid, so that, on fusion, the full (DIPLOID) number is made up. From the Greek haploeides , single.

haploid

  1. (of a cell nucleus) containing one of each type of chromosome.
  2. a haploid organism in which the main life stage has cell nuclei with one of each type of chromosome, written as ‘n’. Such organisms (e.g. fungi, many algae) usually have a brief DIPLOID (2) phase (2n), returning to the haploid state via MEIOSIS. See ALTERNATION OF GENERATIONS.

haploid,

adj possessing just one set of nonhomologous chromosomes. Also called
monoploid or
monoploidic.

haploid

having half the number of chromosomes characteristically found in the somatic (diploid) cells of an organism; typical of the gametes of a species whose union restores the diploid number.

haploid karyotype
References in periodicals archive ?
24) who suggested "dispermic fertilization of a parthenogenetically activated oocyte, that is, fertilization by two spermatozoa of two identical haploid ova".
Time dependent death rates of haploid gynogen, diploid gynogen and control group embryos are shown at Table 1.
Conventional inbred line development is extensively time consuming process, whereas alternatively development of maize inbred lines using doubled haploid (DH) technology has become a very useful technology in breeding research (Rober et al.
Activated charcoal induced high frequency microspore embryogenesis and efficient doubled haploid production in Brassica juncea.
Additionally, since embryonic stem cells can convert into almost any cell type, the haploid stem cells can be used to investigate any number of conditions in any number of cell types.
NA NA Glottidia pyramidata NA NA Order Acrotretida Family Discinidae Discradisca stella Inland Sea 1 Class Articulata Order Terebratulida Suborder Terebratelidina Family Terebratulida crossei Okirai Bay 10 Cancellothyrididae Family Laqueidae Laqueus rubellus Okirai Bay 5 Laqueus blanfordi Okirai Bay 3 Terebratalia Okirai Bay 1 coreanica Suborder Terebratelidina Family Platidiidae Platidia japonica Okirai Bay 3 Haploid DNA content C value Taxa Species [+ or -] SE (pg) Class Inarticulata Order Lingulida Family Lingulidae Lingula anatina 0.
First, they sequenced the maternal plasma DNA to a depth of 78-fold haploid genome coverage (3), compared with the 65-fold haploid coverage previously reported (2).
6) Sperm and egg cells are referred to as being haploid because they have half the number of chromosomes.
They could see, by comparing the sequences of the chromosomes in the diploid cells with those in the haploid sperm cells, where each recombination event took place.
Why mitochondrial genes ditch their cushy haploid environs to take up residence in a large and chaotic nucleus long has stumped evolutionary biologists, but scientists from Indiana University, Bloomington, report that they have uncovered an important due in flowering plants.