haphazard


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hap·haz·ard

(hap-haz'ărd),
Lacking any coherent system, organization, or objective; not to be confused with random or chaotic.
References in classic literature ?
To us it seems that every institution and relationship was the fruit of haphazard and tradition and the manifest sport of chance, their laws each made for some separate occasion and having no relation to any future needs, their customs illogical, their education aimless and wasteful.
The distinction between the elder children and the younger corresponded almost to the distinction between a higher class and a lower one, for with only a haphazard education and insufficient allowances, the younger children had picked up accomplishments, friends, and points of view which were not to be found within the walls of a public school or of a Government office.
I followed Irving, too, in my later reading, but at haphazard, and with other authors at the same time.
Vasili Andreevich did not pay Nikita the eighty rubles a year such a man was worth, but only about forty, which he gave him haphazard, in small sums, and even that mostly not in cash but in goods from his own shop and at high prices.
As on the previous day, just for the joy of it, he followed cattle-trails at haphazard and worked his way up toward the summits.
It was as if he had studied at the university himself, instead of being ill-equipped from browsing at haphazard through the books in the library.
She began reading the back numbers of the newspaper at haphazard, without any definite idea of what she was looking for.
The houses were not set in rows, forming regular streets, but placed here and there in a haphazard manner which made it puzzling for a stranger to find his way.
This fact, which has been very clearly made out, proves conclusively that it was no mere haphazard burglary.
He had not the knack of surrounding himself with nice people--indeed, for a man of ability and virtue his choice had been singularly unfortunate; he had no guiding principle beyond a certain preference for mediocrity; he was content to settle one of the greatest things in life haphazard, and so, while his investments went right, his friends generally went wrong.
It was a careless, unpremeditated glance, one of those haphazard things men do when they have no immediate call to do anything in particular, but act because they are alive and must do something.
May I ask whether it was altogether a haphazard one?