hantavirus disease

hantavirus disease

A disease caused by viruses of the Hantavirus genus. In Britain it can affect farm, nature conservancy and sewage workers and those engaged in water sports. Many cases are mild and inapparent but severe cases feature high fever, headache, shock, nausea and vomiting and small blood spots (PETECHIAE) in the skin. The eyes are red and the face, neck and shoulders flushed. Blood pressure drops and kidney failure may occur. In 10% of severe cases there is significant bleeding. The virus is carried by rats, field mice and bank voles and probably passed to humans by inhaling dried animal secretions.
References in periodicals archive ?
During 2008-2016, samples from 151 patients having symptoms consistent with hantavirus disease were received for diagnosis at the Institut Pasteur de la Guyane, Cayenne, French Guiana.
Similarly, a positive relationship has been reported for tree seed production, milder climate, and hantavirus disease incidence in Europe (Clement et al.
Predicting the emergence of human hantavirus disease using a combination of viral dynamics and rodent demographic patterns.
In addition, nine diseases were proposed for addition to the list during 1995: genital Chlamydia trachomatis infections, coccidioidomycosis (for regional surveillance), cryptosporidiosis, hantavirus disease, (postdiarrheal) hemolytic uremic syndrome, pediatric infection with human immunodeficiency virus, invasive group A streptococcal infections, streptococcal toxic-shock syndrome, and drug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae invasive disease.
Serological evidence of hantavirus disease in Northern Ireland.
Puumala virus (PUUV) causes most hantavirus disease cases in Central and Western Europe and is the only human pathogenic hantavirus in Fennoscandia (1).
A high population density of bank voles can lead to disease clusters and possible outbreaks of nephropathia epidemica, a mild-to-moderate form of hantavirus disease (3).
Cases of acute hantavirus disease continue to be confirmed in the United States.
Hantavirus disease in the Americas is called hantavirus pulmonary syndrome and in Asia and Europe is called hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS).
Puumala virus (PUUV), by far the most frequent cause of hantavirus disease in Germany (7), causes a milder form of HFRS (8) called nephropathia epidemica (NE).
The continued occurrence of hantavirus disease underscores the importance of minimizing risk for exposure to rodents and their excreta.
Sin Nombre hantavirus disease in a 10-year-old boy and his mother.