handicap

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handicap

 [han´de-kap]
1. a term that is considered offensive when used to denote a physical or mental impairment or characteristic that prevents a person from participating independently in any activity of daily living.
2. according to the World Health Organization, a disadvantage that interferes with performance of life roles and is social, cultural, economic, or environmental in nature. For example, social stigma or environmental barriers may interfere with the employment of a person using a wheelchair even when the person is able to function independently (i.e., lacks a true disability).

hand·i·cap

(hand'ē-kap), Negative or pejorative connotations of this word may render it offensive in some contexts.
1. A physical, mental, or emotional condition that interferes with a person's normal functioning.
2. Reduction in a person's capacity to fulfill a social role as a consequence of an impairment, inadequate training for the role, or other circumstances.

See also: disability.
[fr. hand in cap, (game)]

handicap

/hand·i·cap/ (han´dĭ-kap) any physical or mental defect, congenital or acquired, preventing or restricting a person from participating in normal life or limiting their capacity to work.

handicap

(hăn′dē-kăp′)
n.
1. Usage Problem A physical or mental disability. See Usage Note at handicapped.
2. A disadvantage or inconvenience.
tr.v. handi·capped, handi·capping, handi·caps
To cause to be at a disadvantage; impede.

handicap

Medspeak
(1) A disadvantage experienced by a person due to impairment or disability, which reflects interaction and adaptation to the person’s surroundings, to which may be added stress, which reflects the person’s subjective response to the impairment.
(2) Inability to carry out normal social roles because of an impairment or disability handicap.

Social medicine
(1) Any of a broad range of physical and mental disabilities which substantially limit a person’s major life abilities and opportunities.
(2) The social consequences of disability and/or impairment—e.g., inability to find employment.

handicap

Social medicine Any of a broad range of physical and mental disabilities which substantially limit a person's major life abilities and opportunities. See Americans with Disabilities Act, Disability.

hand·i·cap

(hand'ē-kap)
1. A physical, mental, or emotional condition that interferes with normal functioning.
2. Reduction in the capacity to fulfill a social role as a consequence of an impairment, inadequate training for the role, or other circumstances.
See also: disability
[fr. hand in cap, (game)]

handicap

Any physical, mental or emotional disability that limits full, normal life activity. Handicap may be CONGENITAL or acquired as a result of injury or disease especially to the nervous or musculoskeletal systems.

hand·i·cap

(hand'ē-kap) Negative or pejorative connotations of this word may render it offensive in some contexts.
1. A physical, mental, or emotional condition that interferes with a person's normal functioning.
2. Reduction in a person's capacity to fulfill a social role as a consequence of an impairment, inadequate role training or other circumstances.
[fr. hand in cap, (game)]

handicap,

n a disability that hinders effective function; may involve any combination of physical, emotional, or social factors.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is better to have just one uniform handicapping system.
If the team determines that the student's misbehavior and the handicapping condition are not related and the student is expelled, the school district must continue to provide special education services.
is America's only publicly traded sports handicapping company.
Extreme caution is clearly required in interpreting results from special administrations or regular administrations to people with handicapping conditions (Hartigan & Wigdor, 1989, p.
Jim Feist and I are two of the most recognizable names in sports handicapping history.
We believe he is the brand name in American sports handicapping and represents the positive image of global gaming.
The surprise development, which comes amid intense scrutiny of Britain's handicapping system, was greeted with conditional support from three different sources yesterday.
40 on $80 in theoretical bets to win the National Handicapping Championship's $100,000 first prize in Las Vegas over 159 other qualifiers from around the country.
OTCBB: GWNI), America's only publicly traded sports handicapping firm, announced GWIN's flagship sports handicapping show, "Wayne Allyn Root's WinningEDGE(TM)," is moving this fall to Superstation WGN, where it will reach over 87 million homes (67 million cable households, plus 20 million on DirecTV and Dish networks).
John Bothe accused track management of trying to force him to conduct televised handicapping seminars, which he said could plunge him back into compulsive gambling.
OTCBB: GWNI), America's only publicly traded sports handicapping firm, announced GWIN's flagship sports handicapping show, "Wayne Allyn Root's WinningEDGE(TM)," is moving this fall from Fox Sports Net where it reached 40 million homes to Spike TV, the first network for men, where it will reach 87 million homes.