hamartia


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hamartia

 [ham-ahr´she-ah]
a defect of tissue combination during development.

ha·mar·ti·a

(ham-ahr'shē-ă),
A localized developmental disturbance characterized by abnormal arrangement and/or combinations of the tissues normally present in the area.
[G. hamartion, a bodily defect]

hamartia

/ham·ar·tia/ (ham-ahr´she-ah) defect in tissue combination during development.hamar´tial

hamartia

A near-extinct term for a developmental (embryonic) defect.

ha·mar·ti·a

(ham-ahr'shē-ă)
A localized developmental disturbance characterized by abnormal arrangement and/or combinations of the tissues normally present in the area.
[G. hamartion, a bodily defect]

hamartia

a defect of tissue combination in development.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Hamartia et conflit interieur, la presence du protagoniste mourant dans la derniere scene, tout cela s'ajoute a ce que nous avons defini comme essentiel a la tragedie de Racine, a savoir la reconnaissance de soi et l'acceptation marquant le point culminant de la piece (45).
He became the victim of the prophesied innate hamartia.
He may fail because of hamartia, or he may do evil unwittingly, but there is always the sense that he is kept ignorant of some vital factor, knowledge of which would have enabled him to avoid tragic consequences.
Queda dicho que en la tragedia aristotelica se produce la caida de la buena a la mala fortuna de personas "antes mejores que peores" debido a un "yerro disculpable" o "error grande de las personas": en fin, la hamartia.
tendency to forget the latter and to regard the parts as self-sufficient is somehow akin to tragic hamartia, which is thus intrinsic to all thought, qua involving signification.
como la hamartia de su nacimiento y la fatalidad de la maldicion
Fra Pandolf's portrait of the duchess exemplifies for the duke her hamartia, being so lively that she "miss[es]" or "exceed[s] the mark" (38-39) he draws for decorum.
Turco concludes that The Doctor's Dilemma is a black comedy about the humbug, quackery, opportunism, and unscrupulousness of the medical profession--a comedy, moreover, that blends the sentimental trappings of a well-made, nineteenth-century problem play with such superficial technical elements of classical tragedy as hamartia, reversal, and catastrophe.
In her essay, "The Psychology of Aristotelian Tragedy," Amelie Rorty points out that "waywardness" is a better translation of hamartia than "tragic flaw" and that "the tragic hero's hamartia is an accident of his excellence: his purposes and energy make him susceptible to a kind of waywardness that arises from his character" (11).
Shakespeare got most of his knowledge of Brutus from Plutarch, who describes him as a man given to characteristically thoughtful mistakes, and it is through his encounter with the Plutarchan Brutus that Shakespeare developed a working concept of hamartia as a form of characteristic error.
IN THIS monograph Golden presents a reading of Aristotle's Poetics, taking the concepts of katharsis, hamartia and mimesis as central.
possesses, as hamartia, an excess of virtue, or what I call