haloid


Also found in: Dictionary.
Related to haloid: haloid acid

haloid

(hăl′oyd) [″ + eidos, form, shape]
Resembling salt or a halogen.
References in periodicals archive ?
The four largest works--diptychs titled Haloid US Military, expired July 1958, processed in 2010--are also the "youngest," and their affiliation with cold war imaging technology seems salient.
In 1935, Haloid bought a small photocopier manufacturer that had been using its paper and expanded into the copying business.
Seven years later Haloid joined with British movie firm the Rank Organisation creating Rank Xerox.
It took another two decades and a bet-the-company investment by a small Upstate New York company named Haloid, which later became Xerox Corporation (NYSE: XRX), to commercialize the process.
Seastone Papers, Carriage House Paper, Euraba Paper Company, Pyramid Atlantic, The Haloid Company, American Museum of Papermaking, Hand Papermaking Inc, Zhucheng City Zengyi Papermaking Equipment Co.
As one of the first research scientists hired by the Haloid Company, now known as Xerox Corporation, Gundlach was responsible for finding ways to refine and improve xerography," according to the Hall of Fame.
Gundlach joined the Haloid Company in 1952, about five years after the company had purchased the rights to commercialize xerography, Chester Carlson's invention.
It was the latter - one of the first inventions Gundlach made shortly after he started working for Xerox's predecessor, The Haloid Company -- that caused Chester Carlson, the inventor of xerography, to say to him, "Bob, you're an inventor.
in 1952 when he joined Haloid, a Rochester manufacturer of photographic papers that was trying to commercialize a new process, known as xerography, for making copies.
That innovation enabled Haloid to develop a timely product for the European market and was one of the incentives for the formation of Rank-Xerox, later Xerox Europe.
He begins with the atomic properties of one-electron and two-electron atoms, then explains the atomic properties and periodic trends of atoms with more than two electrons, homonuclear diatomic molecules, gaseous alkali metal haloids with ionic bonds, other heteronuclear diatomic molecules with polar covalent bonds, the Lewis cubical atom model, molecular orbital calculations on heteronuclear diatomic molecules (as well as hybridization and estimation of net atomic charges from calculated electron densities), homonuclear diatomic species of certain second-period elements, structure and bonding (including in simple compounds of the Group 14 elements and those in other Groups), and electron deficient molecules.