hair cell


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hair cell

n.
A cell with hairlike processes, especially one of the sensory epithelial cells present in the organ of Corti.

hair cell

(hār sel)
Sensory epithelial cells present in the spiral organ (organ of Corti), in the maculae and cristae of the membranous labyrinth of the ear, and in taste buds; they are characterized by having long stereocilia or kinocilia (or both) that, seen with the light microscope, appear as fine hairs.
See also: taste cells

hair cell

An epithelial cell possessing stereocilia in the maculae, cristae ampullaris, and the organ of Corti. These cells are receptors for the senses of position and hearing.
See also: cell

hair cell

a sensory epithelial cell of vertebrates that acts as a mechanoreceptor, possessing either one nonmotile cilium (kinocilium) or many nonmotile cilium-like projections of the surface (stereocilia). Such cells are found in the LATERAL-LINE SYSTEM and the ear.
References in periodicals archive ?
Type 2 diabetes alters the functional status of outer hair cells in the cochlea.
Morphologically, intact hair cells maintained their kinociliary bundles, whereas damaged hair cells had hair cell bundles that were splayed, frayed, or missing.
Whereas previous research indicated that hair cells are not replaced, this latest study found that replacement does indeed occur, but at very low levels.
The cause is mostly damage to the inner hair cells specialized sensory cells in the inner ear that transmit information about sounds through the nervous system to the brain.
Rescue of hearing, auditory hair cells, and neurons by CEP-1347/KT7515, an inhibitor of c-Jun N-terminal kinase activation.
Thus, the full range of loudness detection may be a coding property of multiple nerve fibers attached to the same hair cell.
Eight weeks after treatment, we found new auditory hair cells in the Atohl-treated ears of the research animals," reports Dr.
The tiny hair cells in the inner ear can become damaged from the strong vibrations or from too much "wear and tear" on them.
Interruption of the blood supply through the labyrinthine artery for longer than 15 seconds results in hair cell and VIIIth nerve dysfunction which, if continued, is irreversible (Baloh, 1996b).
Different sounds move to the population of hair cells in different ways, thus allowing the brain to distinguish among various sounds, for example, different vowel and consonant sounds.
As a result of these acquisitions, the company's business became the development of hair cell replication technology.
In an animal with normal hearing, tiny muscles in the middle ear contract to reduce the transmission of extremely loud sounds to the inner ear that would reduce hair cell functionality.