haemostasis


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haemostasis

he·mo·sta·sis

(hē'mō-stā'sis)
1. The arrest of bleeding.
2. The arrest of circulation in a part.
3. Stagnation of blood.
Synonym(s): haemostasis.
[hemo- + G. stasis, a standing]

haemostasis

1. Deliberate arrest of bleeding by local compression or clamping of bleeding vessels, by the use of ties (ligatures) around arteries and by various forms of cautery. Haemostasis is essential during surgical procedures to prevent the field of operation becoming obscured by blood.
2. The natural processes by which bleeding stops-constriction of small damaged arteries and blood clotting (coagulation).

haemostasis

deliberate arrest of blood flow, e.g. during surgery

he·mo·sta·sis

(hē'mō-stā'sis)
1. Arrest of bleeding.
2. Arrest of circulation in a part.
3. Stagnation of blood.
Synonym(s): haemostasis.
[hemo- + G. stasis, a standing]
References in periodicals archive ?
The results of the study showed that the administration of mannitol or hypertonic saline with or without the addition of starch could be related to haemostasis impairment, although hypertonic saline seems to be safer due to less alteration in coagulation.
In Group I (GI, 10,62 [+ or -] 4,8kg) the haemostasis method was electrosurgery with laparoscopic bipolar forceps (electrosurgical unit Emai BP150, 150W, forceps 42cm/5mm, EDLO S/A, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil), and in Group II (GII, 11,2 [+ or -] 4,5kg) the method was a laparoscopic clip applier with titanium clips (33cm/10mm, Karl Storz Endoskope, Baden-Wurttemberg, Germany).
Surgical complications included labial burn in two patients in Ligasure group and post-operative bleeding in one case in control group which required return to operation theatre for haemostasis.
Following a feasibility project, IDS and Stago have formed a partnership to assist the French firm in developing coagulation and haemostasis assays for use on the IDS-iSYS immunoanalyzer.
The dos and don'ts of haemostasis and the haemostatic principles were discussed in depth and in detail, providing a well rounded theoretical as well as practical experience.
Fibrin sealants are utilised by surgeons as an adjunct to haemostasis for use in patients undergoing surgery, when control of bleeding by standard surgical techniques is ineffective or impractical.
Fibrin clots can contribute to the local haemostasis, seal capillaries and lymph vessels, provide full surface adherence, eliminate dead spaces and may reduce the need for drains.
Regarding the use of fabric for haemostasis, all the following are true except:
Research objective was to understand development mechanisms of non-developing I trimester pregnancy on the basis of studying frequency of polymorphic alleles in folate metabolism genes MTHFR C677T, MTHFR A1298C, MTRR A66G, MTR A2756G, homocysteine level, platelet and plasma haemostasis sections.
I can now suture, assist with and maintain haemostasis (stopping any bleeding), inject local anaesthetic before procedures, make incisions and excise moles, lumps and bumps etc.