haemoptysis


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haemoptysis

he·mop·ty·sis

(hē-mop'ti-sis)
The spitting of blood derived from the lungs or bronchial tubes as a result of pulmonary or bronchial hemorrhage.
Synonym(s): haemoptysis.
[hemo- + G. ptysis, a spitting]

haemoptysis

Coughing up blood. This is most often an indication of BRONCHITIS or BRONCHIECTASIS or the result of a bout of heavy coughing but may also be caused by TUBERCULOSIS or, more probably nowadays, lung cancer.

he·mop·ty·sis

(hē-mop'ti-sis)
Spitting of blood derived from lungs or bronchial tubes as a result of pulmonary or bronchial hemorrhage.
Synonym(s): haemoptysis.
[hemo- + G. ptysis, a spitting]
References in periodicals archive ?
Peripheral pulmonary artery pseudoaneurysms and massive haemoptysis.
We recommend that centres in which thoracic surgery is performed maintain a range of specialised tubes, bougies and catheters to allow for management of severe haemoptysis, difficult airways and tube exchanges.
Urgent problems that need to be addressed first include pain, haemoptysis, severe dyspnoea or respiratory distress, superior vena cava syndrome, hypercalcaemia, paraplegia and brain metastases.
Foreign body aspiration of grass influorescences as a cause of haemoptysis.
He gave no history of diarrhoea, abdominal pain or haemoptysis before admission.
Two days prior to presentation he experienced increasing dyspnoea and haemoptysis of approximately 25 ml per day.
A 73-year-old woman with a longstanding history of type 2 diabetes, complicated by hypertension and hypercholesterolaemia, presented to the casualty department with a 3-week history of malaise, worsening cough with dyspnoea and episodic minor haemoptysis.
He developed oral pharyngeal ulceration, acute lung injury, haematemesis, haemoptysis and renal failure.
Following this period, the patient may present with recurrent haemoptysis and symptoms consistent with bronchitis, pneumonia and bronchiectasis, such as chronic cough productive of sputum, and wheeze (3,4).
Clinical symptoms Median duration Present Initial Initial of symptoms at symptom symptom until seen at ENT Symptom interview complex alone clinic (months) Hoarseness 49 (98%) 35 (70%) 19 (38%) 5 Cough 27 (54%) 14 (28%) 4 (8%) 4 Dysphagia 29 (58%) 4 (8%) 2 Odynophagia 31 (62%) 12 (24%) 1 (2%) 3 Airway obstruction 32 (64%) 6 (12%) 1 (2%) 1 Haemoptysis 6 (12%) 1 (2%) 2 Neck mass 13 (26%) 8 (16%) 3 (6%) 4 Pain over larynx 3 (6%) 3 (6%) 0 (0%) 5 Otalgia 2 (4%) 0 (0%) 0 (0%) 5 Table II.
A 41-year-old man with two episodes of haemoptysis was referred to the Respiratory Medicine Unit at Sir Run Run Shaw Hospital, Hangzhou, China.
Clinical information that should raise suspicion of tracheobronchial injury includes tension pneumothorax; a large air-leak and failure of the lung or a segment of the lung to expand after placement of a thoracostomy tube, pneumomediastinum, subcutaneous emphysema; and haemoptysis (2).