haemophilias

haemophilias

a group of inherited conditions in which blood coagulation is defective, resulting in an increased tendency to bleed, both spontaneously and as a result of trauma. For this reason, participation in contact sport is not advised.
References in periodicals archive ?
Historically, the haemophilias were all considered to be one entity until detailed blood separation techniques allowed more in-depth analyses and categorisation.
Haemophilia is a serious medical condition, resulting in prolonged or intensive episodes of bleeding.
haemophilia, with an emphasis on the ocular presentations that may be seen in both diagnosed and
Haemophilia is a collection of coagulopathies where the affected individual is unable to produce the correct protein factors required for blood clot formation, resulting in prolonged or intensive episodes of bleeding.
4) While haemophilia affects the whole body, ocular complications are likely given the rich vasculature and high sensitivity of the eye.
Haemophilia is relatively rare; consequently there are few epidemiological studies that focus on the ocular manifestations of the disease.
Haemophilia A and B are rare inherited bleeding disorders characterized in the most severe form by spontaneous bleeding into joint and muscles associated with invalidating arthropathy, as well as by more serious bleeds, namely intracranial haemorrhage (1).
The haemophilia comprehensive care model, which is defined as the continuing supervision of all medical and psychosocial factors affecting patients and their families, has been a cornerstone and one of the most successful health programmes in developed countries, resulting in a significant improvement of health and, ultimately, of life expectancy for haemophilia community (6,7).
The World Federation of Haemophilia (WFH) is a non-profit organization founded in 1963 with the aim of improving global haemophilia care to all people with haemophilia, wherever they live.
The importance of the comprehensive haemophilia care worldwide has been further emphasized this year by the WFH, when this theme has been chosen for the World Haemophilia Day 2009 (17 April).
This editorial is published on the occasion of World Haemophilia Day--April 17, 2009.
Back to the future: a recent history of haemophilia treatment.