haematoma

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Related to haematomas: oedema

haematoma

See hematoma.

he·ma·to·ma

(hē'mă-tō'mă)
A localized mass of extravasated blood that is relatively or completely confined within an organ or tissue, a space, or a potential space; the blood is usually clotted, and, depending on how long it has been there, may manifest various degrees of organization and decolorization.
Synonym(s): haematoma.

haematoma

An accumulation of free blood anywhere in the body, that has partially clotted to form a semi-solid mass. Haematomas may be caused by injury or may occur spontaneously as a result of a bleeding or clotting disorder. In some sites, as within the skull, enlarging haematomas may be very dangerous. Infected haematomas may form abscesses.

haematoma

a swelling, composed of extravasated blood, which is usually traumatic in origin. One of the most common injuries in sport and one which benefits from early treatment with ice, compression and elevation.

haematoma

localized mass of extravasated and clotted blood, due to local tissue injury or trauma, blood vessel severance or rupture, failure to tie off or coagulate vessels during surgery or close deep areas of a surgical wound with soluble sutures; a large haematoma will act as a focus for infection; intramuscular haematoma predisposes to local fibrosis ± ectopic calcification

haematoma

A swelling containing blood. It may result from injury (e.g. black eye) or from some blood disease, such as leukaemia. Note: also spelt hematoma.

he·ma·to·ma

(hē'mă-tō'mă)
Localized mass of extravasated blood relatively or completely confined within an organ or space; blood usually clots.
Synonym(s): haematoma.
[hemato- + G. -oma, tumor]

Patient discussion about haematoma

Q. What is hematoma?

A. "hem" means blood, it's a very common bruise - when you fall off your bicycles, you get hit. if you don't cut yourself too in the process- blood vessels usually get ripped and blood flows to that area. this causes a red/blue color. after a couple of weeks it'll change color to green and then yellow. this is the blood cells disintegrate.

More discussions about haematoma
References in periodicals archive ?
CT scan showed resolving periduodenal haematoma and resolved pelvic haemoperitoneum.
MacLauchlan described the first report of intramural intestinal haematoma in an article published in Lancet in 1838 (1) and the first radiological description was made by Liverud (1).
As the mediastinal haematoma was causing ongoing tracheal compression distal to the endotracheal tube, surgical evacuation was considered necessary.
Traumatic retropharyngeal haematoma has been well documented (10-12), often involving minor head injury and hyperextension of the cervical spine.
When the only sign of injury was a subdural haematoma it was normal to question whether it was non-accidental.
The injury is usually secondary to ear inflammation which should be treated by your vet as well as the haematoma.
A massive retropharyngeal haematoma was observed extending between C2 and T4 vertebral body levels with displacement and compression of the trachea (Figure 1,2).
After two further attempts, the procedure was abandoned and firm pressure was applied to the area to prevent haematoma formation.
A conservative approach can be adopted in stable patients with small nonexpanding haematomas; intravenous steroids reduce soft tissue swelling and haematoma resolution can be monitored radiographically.
Key Words: neuroendoscopy, hydrocephalus, iatrogenic complication, intracranial hypotension, haematoma
With mild cases now being readily diagnosed, there has been an increase in the number of conservatively treated spinal haematomas over the past decade.
The treatment will depend on how quickly the haematoma is identified and its size but can consist of a minor surgical procedure.