haematogenous spread

haematogenous spread

spread of microorganisms via circulating blood
References in periodicals archive ?
Hypotheses to explain laryngeal involvement include haematogenous spread from a primary focus, such as the lung, or direct implantation by inhalation.
In the present case report, bone involvement also appeared to be a part of haematogenous spread, since both liver and bone were involved.
Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the most common pathogenic organism, can manifest itself within the abdomen via haematogenous spread from a pulmonary primary, transmural invasion of the bowel following ingestion, reactivation of dormant disease or tuberculous salpingitis.
In immunocompromised patients in particular, haematogenous spread of MTB from a primary focus can result in mammary TB.
However, even in patients without circulating plasma cells, the haematogenous spread of their lymphoid progenitors has been postulated as a possible mechanism for CNS involvement (6).
The vertebral venous plexus, via its communication with pelvic veins, provides a direct route for haematogenous spread of cancer from the bladder to the epidural space or vertebral body (1).
Haematogenous spread occurs to the brain parenchyma or leptomeninges and can result in meningitis, abscess or granuloma formation and infarction [27].
The majority develop from haematogenous spread of circulating organisms to the bone or joint, but a minority arise from direct contamination by penetrating wounds or surgery.
The most likely route in primary gastroduodenal tuberculosis is haematogenous spread, lymphatic spread and spread from the serosa by continuity from adjacent structures, especially the lymph-nodes.
ITB results from haematogenous spread or spread from contiguous lymph nodes or swallowed infected sputum.
They result from direct or haematogenous spread of pathogens, or when a haematoma becomes infected.
Transport to the ganglia is thought to be via retrograde axonal transport (from the skin) and via haematogenous spread.