habituation


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habituation

 [hah-bich″u-a´shun]
1. the gradual adaptation to a stimulus or to the environment.
2. the extinction of a conditioned reflex by repetition of the conditioned stimulus.
3. older term denoting sometimes tolerance and other times a psychological dependence resulting from the repeated consumption of a drug, with a desire to continue its use, but with little or no tendency to increase the dose.

ha·bit·u·a·tion

(ha-bit'chū-ā'shŭn),
1. The process of forming a habit, referring generally to psychological dependence on the continued use of a drug to maintain a sense of well-being, which can result in drug addiction.
2. The method by which the nervous system reduces or inhibits responsiveness during repeated stimulation.

habituation

/ha·bit·u·a·tion/ (hah-bich″u-a´shun)
1. the gradual adaptation to a stimulus or to the environment, with a decreasing response.
2. an older term denoting sometimes tolerance and sometimes a psychological dependence due to repeated consumption of a drug, with a desire to continue its use, but with little or no tendency to increase the dose.

habituation

(hə-bĭch′o͞o-ā′shən)
n.
1. The process of habituating or the state of being habituated.
2. Physiological tolerance to a drug resulting from repeated use.
3. Psychology The decline in responsiveness to a stimulus due to repeated exposure.

habituation

[həbich′o̅o̅·ā′shən]
Etymology: L, habituare, to become used to
1 an acquired tolerance gained by repeated exposure to a particular stimulus such as alcohol.
2 a decline and eventual elimination of a conditioned response by repetition of the conditioned stimulus.
3 psychological and emotional dependence on a drug, tobacco, or alcohol that results from the repeated use of the substance but without the addictive, physiological need to increase dosage. Also called negative adaptation. Compare addiction.
4 internal readiness to demonstrate a consistent pattern of behavior guided by habits and roles; this readiness is associated with specific temporal, physical, or social environments.

habituation

Psychology An adaptive response characterized by a ↓ reactivity to a repeated stimulus–eg, a substance of abuse or repeated electrical stimulation of a nerve

ha·bit·u·a·tion

(hă-bich'ū-ā'shŭn)
1. The process of forming a habit, referring generally to psychological dependence on the continued use of a drug to maintain a sense of well-being, which can result in drug addiction.
2. The method by which the nervous system reduces or inhibits responsiveness during repeated stimulation.

habituation

The development of a tolerance or dependence by repetition or prolonged exposure. From the Latin habituare , to bring into a condition.

habituation

the progressive loss of a behavioural response as a result of continued stimulation.

habituation

the reduction in the strength or frequency of a response to a stimulus due to repeated exposure to the stimulus.

habituation

reduction of a desired drug response, or the need for greater dose to achieve the early response, due to repeated use of the drug

habituation,

n the process of decreased response to repeated stimulation.

ha·bit·u·a·tion

(hă-bich'ū-ā'shŭn)
1. Process of forming a habit, referring generally to psychological dependence on continued use of a drug to maintain a sense of well-being, which can result in drug addiction.
2. Method by which nervous system reduces or inhibits responsiveness during repeated stimulation.

habituation,

n a state in which an individual involuntarily tends to continue the use of a drug. Generally refers to the state in which an individual continues self-administration of a drug because of psychologic dependence without physical dependence.
Haemophilus
n a genus of gram-negative pathogenic bacteria, frequently found in the respiratory tract of humans and other animals.
Haemophilus are generally sensitive to cephalosporins, tetracyclines, and sulfonamides.
H. influenzae,
n a small, gram-negative, nonmotile, parasitic bacterium that occurs in two forms, encapsulated and nonencapsulted, and in six types: A, B, C, D, E, and F. Almost all infections are caused by the encapsulated type B organisms. It is found in the throats of 30% of healthy, normal people. It may cause destructive inflammation of the larynx, trachea, and bronchi in children and debilitated older people.

habituation

1. the gradual adaptation to a stimulus or to the environment.
2. the extinction of a conditioned reflex by repetition of the conditioned stimulus; called also negative adaptation.
References in periodicals archive ?
That may be determined by habituation, by eyesight, or by other factors.
6) It is easy to mistake De Quincey's footnote as little more than a casual swipe at Coleridge (his sometime friend and sometime rival dating back to 1807), but when we take into account how the footnote evokes multiple imagined, fictional renderings of Coleridge, we glimpse how even passing literary representation of opium consumption underwrites lasting perceptions of dangerous habituation in the nineteenth century.
Previous research has shown that the normal human fetus habituates, but habituation rates are altered if the fetus is exposed to reduced oxygen levels, maternal smoking, maternal sedatives, and impaired fetal growth," he added.
On Days 2 and 3, all rats were given free access to saccharin for 10 min to assess the extent of habituation of neophobia (an increase in consumption on Days 2 and 3 relative to Day 1).
Typically, an unconditioned response or reflex that is elicited by an unconditioned stimulus will show habituation if the stimulus is repeated (Gluck et al.
However, the parents who were absent in this group of highly anxious children reported significantly higher discomfort of their child in the habituation session (p=0.
The habituation is especially useful when the stimulus is known to be a fearful thing, but nothing unpleasant ever happens when it is presented.
2003), the aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of the systemic administration of (-)-linalool on behavioral models that assess different types of memory in rats: recognition object test, inhibitory avoidance and habituation to a novel environment.
They may have gastroesophageal reflux disease issues and even ongoing asthma, but by the time they develop this cough that's been going on for 15 or 25 years, there's clearly habituation.
Preintervention data showed no pattern of spontaneous remission or habituation, and, in fact, an increasing anticipatory anxiety was observed before hypnotic treatment.
Habituation is a type of non-associative learning when an organism learns not to respond to an irrelevant stimulus that initially elicited a response (Muller and Hildebrandt, 2002).