habituation


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habituation

 [hah-bich″u-a´shun]
1. the gradual adaptation to a stimulus or to the environment.
2. the extinction of a conditioned reflex by repetition of the conditioned stimulus.
3. older term denoting sometimes tolerance and other times a psychological dependence resulting from the repeated consumption of a drug, with a desire to continue its use, but with little or no tendency to increase the dose.

ha·bit·u·a·tion

(ha-bit'chū-ā'shŭn),
1. The process of forming a habit, referring generally to psychological dependence on the continued use of a drug to maintain a sense of well-being, which can result in drug addiction.
2. The method by which the nervous system reduces or inhibits responsiveness during repeated stimulation.

habituation

/ha·bit·u·a·tion/ (hah-bich″u-a´shun)
1. the gradual adaptation to a stimulus or to the environment, with a decreasing response.
2. an older term denoting sometimes tolerance and sometimes a psychological dependence due to repeated consumption of a drug, with a desire to continue its use, but with little or no tendency to increase the dose.

habituation

(hə-bĭch′o͞o-ā′shən)
n.
1. The process of habituating or the state of being habituated.
2. Physiological tolerance to a drug resulting from repeated use.
3. Psychology The decline in responsiveness to a stimulus due to repeated exposure.

habituation

[həbich′o̅o̅·ā′shən]
Etymology: L, habituare, to become used to
1 an acquired tolerance gained by repeated exposure to a particular stimulus such as alcohol.
2 a decline and eventual elimination of a conditioned response by repetition of the conditioned stimulus.
3 psychological and emotional dependence on a drug, tobacco, or alcohol that results from the repeated use of the substance but without the addictive, physiological need to increase dosage. Also called negative adaptation. Compare addiction.
4 internal readiness to demonstrate a consistent pattern of behavior guided by habits and roles; this readiness is associated with specific temporal, physical, or social environments.

habituation

Psychology An adaptive response characterized by a ↓ reactivity to a repeated stimulus–eg, a substance of abuse or repeated electrical stimulation of a nerve

ha·bit·u·a·tion

(hă-bich'ū-ā'shŭn)
1. The process of forming a habit, referring generally to psychological dependence on the continued use of a drug to maintain a sense of well-being, which can result in drug addiction.
2. The method by which the nervous system reduces or inhibits responsiveness during repeated stimulation.

habituation

The development of a tolerance or dependence by repetition or prolonged exposure. From the Latin habituare , to bring into a condition.

habituation

the progressive loss of a behavioural response as a result of continued stimulation.

habituation

the reduction in the strength or frequency of a response to a stimulus due to repeated exposure to the stimulus.

habituation

reduction of a desired drug response, or the need for greater dose to achieve the early response, due to repeated use of the drug

habituation,

n the process of decreased response to repeated stimulation.

ha·bit·u·a·tion

(hă-bich'ū-ā'shŭn)
1. Process of forming a habit, referring generally to psychological dependence on continued use of a drug to maintain a sense of well-being, which can result in drug addiction.
2. Method by which nervous system reduces or inhibits responsiveness during repeated stimulation.

habituation,

n a state in which an individual involuntarily tends to continue the use of a drug. Generally refers to the state in which an individual continues self-administration of a drug because of psychologic dependence without physical dependence.
Haemophilus
n a genus of gram-negative pathogenic bacteria, frequently found in the respiratory tract of humans and other animals.
Haemophilus are generally sensitive to cephalosporins, tetracyclines, and sulfonamides.
H. influenzae,
n a small, gram-negative, nonmotile, parasitic bacterium that occurs in two forms, encapsulated and nonencapsulted, and in six types: A, B, C, D, E, and F. Almost all infections are caused by the encapsulated type B organisms. It is found in the throats of 30% of healthy, normal people. It may cause destructive inflammation of the larynx, trachea, and bronchi in children and debilitated older people.

habituation

1. the gradual adaptation to a stimulus or to the environment.
2. the extinction of a conditioned reflex by repetition of the conditioned stimulus; called also negative adaptation.
References in periodicals archive ?
After this period of habituation to fluid restriction in both temporal contexts, all of the rats had access to water in the morning session (15 min) for two days.
Dix-Hallpike being negative, their symptoms resolved with vestibular habituation exercises itself.
Effects of interstimulus interval length and variability on startle-response habituation in the rat.
Short-term habituation would thus enhance the salience and consequently the processing of the differential roughness of A and B, and it would do so more efficiently during simultaneous than sequential preexposure.
I've been shooting plain black-on-black, post-in-notch sights for more than 50 years, and habituation may certainly have something to do with it.
In my opinion, active jaguar habituation remains one of the major threats to the species in the northern Pantanal,' says Rogerio Cunha de Paula, executive coordinator of the Pro-Carnivoros Institute a Brazilian NGO.
Habituation occurs after the fetus stops responding to the stimuli.
This essay argues that Thomas De Quincey defines 'authentic' opium habituation as the effective management of one's own personal slavery, and he uses Samuel Taylor Coleridge as a straw man to illustrate the perils of unmanaged, 'illegitimate' opium use.
Habituation is a factor in gun selection, and so is finger length.
Leo Leader, a senior lecturer in the School of Women's and Children's Health at the University of New South Wales said that this study used a process of habituation, which is the ability of an organism to stop responding to repeated stimulation.
However, measures such as polygraphs have been challenged for decades because of limitations such as susceptibility to countermeasures (National Research Council, 2003), the habituation effect (Elaad & Ben-Shakhar, 1997; Verschuere, Crombez, De Clercq, & Koster, 2004), and an individual's level of morality and ethics, with each one producing experimental variability.
phenomena that presumably concern processing of the CS): the habituation of neophobia and the extinction of associations (specifically, the effects of swim on the reacquisition of extinguished associations).