habit

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habit

 [hab´it]
1. an action that has become automatic or characteristic by repetition.
2. predisposition; bodily temperament.

hab·it

(hab'it),
1. An act, behavioral response, practice, or custom established in one's repertoire by frequent repetition of the same activity.
See also: addiction.
2. A basic variable in the study of conditioning and learning used to designate a new response learned either by association or by being followed by a reward or reinforced event.
[L. habeo, pp. habitus, to have]

habit

/hab·it/ (hab´it)
1. an action which has become automatic or characteristic by repetition.
2. predisposition or bodily temperament.

habit

(hăb′ĭt)
n.
a. A recurrent, often unconscious pattern of behavior that is acquired through frequent repetition: made a habit of going to bed early.
b. An established disposition of the mind or character: a pessimistic habit.
c. Customary manner or practice: an early riser by habit.
d. An addiction, especially to a narcotic drug.

habit

Etymology: L, habitus, condition
1 a customary or particular practice, manner, or mode of behavior.
2 an involuntary pattern of behavior or thought.
3 colloquial, the habitual use of drugs or narcotics. See also habit spasm, habit training, habitus.

habit

Vox populi A practice routinely or regularly performed by a person. See Bad habit, Good habit, Oral parafunctional habit.

hab·it

(hab'it)
1. An act, behavioral response, practice, or custom established in one's repertoire by frequent repetition of the same act.
See also: addiction
2. A basic variable in the study of conditioning and learning used to designate a new response learned either by association or by being followed by a reward or reinforced event.
See: conditioning, learning
3. An autonomic behavior integrated into a more complex pattern to function on a daily basis.
[L. habeo, pp. habitus, to have]

habit

A predictable sequence of reactions to common stimuli or behaviour occurring in particular contexts. Habits are conditioned, are often performed automatically and unconsciously, and avoid the need for decision-making.

habit

the general appearance and form of branching in plants. For example, dandelions can have an erect or prostrate habit, depending on location. See PHENOTYPIC PLASTICITY.

Habit

Referring to the particular set of physical and mental tensions present in any individual.
Mentioned in: Alexander Technique

habit

(1) a tendency to behave in a certain way; (2) a well-learned behavioural response associated with a particular stimulus or situation, typically evoked without conscious intention.

hab·it

(hab'it)
An act, behavioral response, practice, or custom established in one's repertoire by frequent repetition of the same activity.
[L. habeo, pp. habitus, to have]

habit,

n the tendency toward an act that has become a repeated performance, relatively fixed, consistent, easy to perform, and almost automatic. Once learned, habits may occur without the intent of the person or may appear to be out of control and are difficult to change. In dentistry, habits such as bruxism, clenching, tongue thrusting, and lip and cheek biting may produce injury to the teeth, their attachment apparatus, oral mucosa, mandibular and temporomandibular musculature, and articulation.

habit

1. an action that has become automatic or characteristic by repetition.
2. predisposition; bodily temperament.

Patient discussion about habit

Q. Alcoholism becomes a habit in person? How does alcoholism becomes a habit in person?

A. If you think about alcohol all the time and you need it to feel good then it's a problem. If it's just a rare but pleasant action then there is no big disaster.
It may be a problem if the alcohol being the cause of depending (physical or corporial it is not just the same!)

Q. I am trying my best to reduce my habit towards drugs. I am trying my best to reduce my habit towards drugs. I got many advices to stay away from hard drugs. What's the difference between 'hard' and 'soft' drugs?

A. No difference

Q. is red meat bad for you??? and what about white meat like pork??? why is consider to be healthy eating vegie what are the advantages of this kind of diet ?

A. Eating a lot of red meat is considered to be a risk factor for developing colon cancer, and therefore it is advised not to eat too much of it. On the other hand, a diet rich with vegetables and fruit is considered very good because of the high fiber content, which is very benefitial for your gastrointestinal system. A diet poor with high fiber products is also considered a risk factor for the developement of colon cancer. White meat has a high content of fat and cholesterol, and is also not very recommended to be eating a lot of.

More discussions about habit
References in classic literature ?
A soldier -- New England's most distinguished soldier -- he stood firmly on the pedestal of his gallant services; and, himself secure in the wise liberality of the successive administrations through which he had held office, he had been the safety of his subordinates in many an hour of danger and heart-quake General Miller was radically conservative; a man over whose kindly nature habit had no slight influence; attaching himself strongly to familiar faces, and with difficulty moved to change, even when change might have brought unquestionable improvement.
That sound commonly reminds us that we are growing rusty and antique in our employments and habits of thoughts.
Habits are at the same time dispositions, but dispositions are not necessarily habits.
Hunt and his party, on their journey across the mountains to Astoria, who came near betraying them into the hands of the Crows, and who remained among the tribe, marrying one of their women, and adopting their congenial habits.
What is there in that pocket-handkerchief, dear Mademoiselle Hennequin," asked Betts Shoreham, who had a pernicious habit of calling young ladies with whom he was on terms of tolerable intimacy, "dear,"--a habit that sometimes misled persons as to the degree of interest he felt in his companions--"what CAN there be in that pocket- handkerchief to excite tears from a mind and a heart like yours?
My early habits had gifted me with a feminine sensibility and too exquisite refinement.
which indeed are arts of state, and arts of life, as Tacitus well calleth them), to him, a habit of dissimulation is a hinderance and a poorness.
They were all gratified by this praise of their native county; and Mary now had the pleasure of hearing these short questions and answers lose their undertone of suspicious inspection, so far as her brothers were concerned, and develop into a genuine conversation about the habits of birds which afterwards turned to a discussion as to the habits of solicitors, in which it was scarcely necessary for her to take part.
Causes of Variability -- Effects of Habit -- Correlation of Growth -- Inheritance -- Character of Domestic Varieties -- Difficulty of distinguishing between Varieties and Species -- Origin of Domestic Varieties from one or more Species -- Domestic Pigeons, their Differences and Origin -- Principle of Selection anciently followed, its Effects -- Methodical and Unconscious Selection -- Unknown Origin of our Domestic Productions -- Circumstances favourable to Man's power of Selection.
The Tucutuco (Ctenomys Brasiliensis) is a curious small animal, which may be briefly described as a Gnawer, with the habits of a mole.
And if some one prescribes for him a course of dietetics, and tells him that he must swathe and swaddle his head, and all that sort of thing, he replies at once that he has no time to be ill, and that he sees no good in a life which is spent in nursing his disease to the neglect of his customary employment; and therefore bidding good-bye to this sort of physician, he resumes his ordinary habits, and either gets well and lives and does his business, or, if his constitution falls, he dies and has no more trouble.
But all that is observed or discovered is a certain set of habits in the use of words.