gurgle

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gurgle

Etymology: Fr, gargouiller, to gurgle
an abnormal coarse sound heard during auscultation, especially over large cavities or a trachea nearly filled with secretions.
References in classic literature ?
But the quiet, steady hustling and pushing and gurgling went on just the same.
Then came a stillness more distracting than sound, and then a great gurgling and rushing and splashing of water.
He touched her ear and a little bit of neck under it with his lips, and they sat quite still for many minutes which flowed by them like a small gurgling brook with the kisses of the sun upon it.
She bites her under-lip and clutches the bed with both hands, really she is doing her best for me, but first comes a smothered gurgling sound, then her hold on herself relaxes and she shakes with mirth.
As she was thinking of these things the while she debated the wisdom of uncovering the baby's face, there came a little grunt from the wee bundle in her lap, and then a gurgling coo that set her heart in raptures.
He sucked in his lips for a moment with a slight gurgling sound.
And I have seen it," the girl retorted, with a note of grimness in her tone, "when it was a great deal more like the other place--stillness that seems almost to stifle you, grey mists that choke your breath and blot out everything; nothing but the gurgling of a little water, and the sighing--the most melancholy sighing you ever heard--of the wind in our ragged elms.
Against the foot of a steep-sloped knoll he came upon a magnificent group of redwoods that seemed to have gathered about a tiny gurgling spring.
His quick ears caught a similar gurgling from the right in the direction of the next alleyway.
In the other hand he held a bottle, which, from time to time, was inverted above his head to the accompaniment of gurgling noises.
Little Silverstein, shouting out Joe's name with high glee, shrank away from Ponta's gaze, shrivelled as in fierce heat, the sound gurgling and dying in his throat.
Mine is no squalor of song that cannot transmute itself, with proper exchange value, into a flower-crowned cottage, a sweet mountain-meadow, a grove of red-woods, an orchard of thirty-seven trees, one long row of blackberries and two short rows of strawberries, to say nothing of a quarter of a mile of gurgling brook.