gurgle

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Related to gurgled: gargled

gurgle

Etymology: Fr, gargouiller, to gurgle
an abnormal coarse sound heard during auscultation, especially over large cavities or a trachea nearly filled with secretions.
References in classic literature ?
The poop scuppers gurgled and sobbed for a little while longer, and then perfect silence, joined to perfect immobility, proclaimed the yet unbroken spell of our helplessness, poised on the edge of some violent issue, lurking in the dark.
The other man spat suddenly on the pavement, and gurgled in his throat.
Some lock below gurgled in its throat immediately afterwards, and then a door crashed.
The baby looked happy and gurgled away, But the mother looked worried I must say, The nurse came with a syringe in her hand, The mother then fainted, bound on floor to land.
But when two dancers entered the space in water-filled galoshes and gurgled, bubbled, and swished their way through the space, they functioned as a palate-clearing sorbet for the eyes and ears.
Mum-of-two Katie, 35, battled bravely on as the 17-month-old gurgled into her microphone.
In April, the banks were lined with fisherman, today the creek gurgled and the sun glinted off the snow-capped Glass Mountains as the two enjoyed what amounted to a private stream.
If a researcher avoided eye contact and offered no sweets, infants repeatedly smiled, gurgled, and otherwise tried to capture her attention.
EVEN as the rest of Parliament gurgled down the plug-hole of mediocrity, the Speakership at least seemed safe as the final bastion of fair play.
He was my second ride back at Fakenham last week but he didn't have a tongue strap on there and gurgled.
Newt Gingrich, fresh from exile under a rock, gurgled in front of a national television audience that "Freedom is beach volleyball.
The water at the bottom of the pipe sloshed, sucked, and gurgled gently the whole time, making it apparent that however sturdy they look, the foundations themselves have little upon which to rest.