gurgle


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gurgle

Etymology: Fr, gargouiller, to gurgle
an abnormal coarse sound heard during auscultation, especially over large cavities or a trachea nearly filled with secretions.
References in classic literature ?
Miss Bartlett, who was poor at figures, became bewildered and rendered up the sovereign, amidst the suppressed gurgles of the other youths.
So intent was he upon this personal appraisement of his features that he did not hear the parting of the tall grass behind him as a great body pushed itself stealthily through the jungle; nor did his companion, the ape, hear either, for he was drinking and the noise of his sucking lips and gurgles of satisfaction drowned the quiet approach of the intruder.
If the only way to get home is to meet the Gurgles, then we've got to meet 'em.
But that will all change when the Giant Gurgle is finally built.
99 and will combine educational articles from gurgle.
But hey, it's the body and it's a fascinating machine," said Sylvia Branzei, "professor" of Gut and Gurgle U and well-known author of the book series and national touring exhibit Grossology(R).
The Labour spin doctors know that when it comes to obscuring Government failure, one genuine gurgle from Leo Blair is going to be worth hours of feigned sincerity from his father.
It seems the less frantic pace of life outside big cities helps couples conceive," the Sun quoted Gurgle.
The emissions recorded by Scarf, some of which were audible over loudspeakers as a sort of gentle gurgle, at first intensified as expected, but then failed to climax in a pronounced "whomp
Names like Edna, Ethel, Walter and Percy are plummeting in popularity and have almost died out, research for gurgle.
You can get a wonderful chortle or gurgle when you comb baby's hair, which encourages the parents to do more.
But mud, chalk, coal and matches were also on the list, gurgle.