guilt


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guilt

(gĭlt)
n.
1.
a. The fact of being responsible for the commission of an offense; moral culpability: The investigation uncovered the suspect's guilt.
b. Law The fact of having been found to have violated a criminal law; legal culpability: The jury's job is to determine the defendant's guilt or innocence.
c. Responsibility for a mistake or error: The guilt for the book's many typos lies with the editor.
2. Remorseful awareness of having done something wrong or violating a rule: Do you feel any guilt for forgetting my birthday? The dieter felt guilt for snacking between meals.
tr.v. guilted, guilting, guilts
1. To make or try to make (someone) feel guilty: My roommate guilted me for forgetting to wash the dishes.
2. To cause (someone) to do something by arousing feelings of guilt: My roommate guilted me into washing the dishes.

guilt

Etymology: AS, gylt, delinquency
a feeling caused by tension between the ego and superego when one falls below the standards set for oneself, or a remorseful awareness of having done something wrong.

guilt

Psychiatry Emotion resulting from doing what one perceives of as wrong, thereby violating superego precepts; results in feelings of worthlessness and at times the need for punishment. See Shame.

guilt

A state of distress usually caused by the belief that one has contravened accepted moral, ethical, religious or legal standards of behaviour. Early conditioning in such matters remains powerful throughout life and guilt may be experienced even when early precepts have been long-since been abandoned as illogical. A deep, and seemingly inappropriate, sense of guilt is often a feature of psychiatric disorder.
References in periodicals archive ?
The study, Cross-Domain Effects of Guilt on Desire for Self-Improvement Products, is published in the October 2015 issue of the Journal of Consumer Research.
Moms felt more guilt for taking time out of the workday to the extent that most weren't doing it.
From a Nietzschean perspective, Heidegger could be seen as advocating a regressive return to a Christian stance towards conscience and guilt, the result of which is conformity and a pallid sickness.
Christians can respond to their guilt with repentance, or stubbornly resist God's invitation to part from it.
Study leader Professor Joydeep Bhattacharya, from Goldsmiths, University of London, said: "OCD suerers experience more guilt and anxiety out of the kind of negative thoughts we might all have from time to time.
Antigone embodies this nature of action only to a limited extent as her guilt is not essentially rooted in missing knowledge but rather in her very practices of holding herself accountable.
In addition, considering the correlational nature of this study, the TOSCA-3C could not provide a full picture of how shame and guilt differ and function among Chinese people.
Tangney, Stuewig e Mashek (2007) tested the effect of shame and guilt events and found no relationship between the emotion triggered and the fact that other people were aware of the failures in performing an action, a situation hypothetically related to guilt.
Guilt is an emotion characterized by feelings of regret, tension, and remorse over one's behavior (Beck, 1976; Klass, 1987; Kugler & Jones, 1992; Tilghman-Osborne, Cole, Felton, & Ciesla, 2008).
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Guilt is a topic of interest for those exploring the interface between psychology and religion in psychotherapy.
Kim and Cameron, 2011), but also among organizational members and decision-makers themselves, who may experience moral emotions, such as guilt or shame, over the failure (e.