guided tissue regeneration


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guided tissue regeneration

regeneration of tissue directed by the physical presence and/or chemical activities of a biomaterial; often involves placement of barriers to exclude one or more cell types during healing or regeneration of tissue.

guid·ed tis·sue re·gen·er·a·tion

(gīd'ĕd tish'ū rē-jen'ĕr-ā'shŭn)
Regeneration of tissue directed by the physical presence or chemical activities of a biomaterial; often involves placement of barriers to exclude one or more cell types during healing or regeneration of tissue.

guided tissue regeneration

Abbreviation: GTR
Any of the techniques used in periodontics to reconstruct lost or diseased periodontal tissue in those with gingival recession. GTR often involves the use of absorbable barrier membranes or collagen.
See also: regeneration

guid·ed tis·sue re·ge·ner·a·tion

(gīd'ĕd tish'ū rē-jen'ĕr-ā'shŭn)
Regeneration of tissue directed by physical presence and/or chemical activities of a biomaterial; often involves placement of barriers to exclude one or more cell types during healing or regeneration of tissue.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Comparative clinical study of guided tissue regeneration with a bioabsorbable bilayer collagen membrane and subepithelial connective tissue graft".
Histologic assessment of new attachment following the treatment of a human buccal recession by means of a guided tissue regeneration procedure".
The purpose of this case study to evaluate the treatment of endo-periodontal lesion with root canal treatment and guided tissue regeneration with bone graft membrane and free mucosal graft.
Guided tissue regeneration technique: Then crevicular incision was given two teeth distal and mesial to elevate a envelop flap.
This may be largely due to collagen's biologic activities such as (1) being physically absorbable through enzymatic degradation, (2) the chemotactic ability to promote primary wound coverage and reduce the incidence of membrane exposure and bacterial contamination, and (3) the haemostatic capacity to facilitate initial clot formation and wound stability, hence a membrane made of type I collagen is an appropriate biomaterial to be used in guided tissue regeneration (GTR).
Encouraging results were achieved when demineralized freez-dried bone allo-graft was added during guided tissue regeneration to create and maintain the space that is needed for tissue regeneration (23).
Similar result achieved by demineralized freeze dried bone graft (DFDBA) during guided tissue regeneration based root coverage by Kimle et al 2000 (24).