guard

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guard

 [gahrd]
a protective device.
mouth guard any of various removable intraoral appliances that protect the teeth and sometimes the lips and cheeks during contact sports.

guard

(gahrd)
1. To watch over so as to protect or maintain control.
2. A person or thing performing such a function.

guard

A device for protecting something (e.g., a mouth guard or a face guard).

occlusal guard

A removable dental appliance that covers one or both arches and is designed to minimize the damaging effects of bruxism, jaw and head trauma during contact sports, or any detrimental occlusal habits.
See: nightguard; mouth guard
References in periodicals archive ?
CORNELIAN Guards against vocal weaknesses and poor speech, as well as lack of physical and mental energy and poor concentration.
Ask the ISP whether its regional network has several connections to a national network, which guards against a shutdown if one connection goes down.
One Stratus system running HP-UX supports the S2/Open2(TM) Check Authorization application, which guards against check fraud and store liability by a split-second background review on the bank account from which the check funds are being withdrawn.
Worldtalk(TM) Corporation (Nasdaq:WTLK), a leading provider of policy enforcement software solutions for email and Web communications, announced today that its WorldSecure/Mail guards against the latest Internet virus threat to come to light: the MiniZip Worm.
Worldtalk(R) Corporation (NASDAQ: WTLK), a leading provider of policy enforcement software solutions for e-mail and Web communications, announced today that its WorldSecure Server guards against the latest Internet virus threat to come to light: the ExploreZip Worm.
This strategy guards against Internet hackers and network corruption.
With local acknowledgement, the product guards against the loss of SNA sessions while ensuring greater throughput, low latency and greater bandwidth availability than is achievable with wide-area acknowledgement.