group cohesion

group cohesion

a group's tendency to stick together in its pursuit of common goals. Also known as team cohesion.
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The creed also played a significant role in connection with Christian-Muslim identity, faith, and group cohesion parallel to the resource acquisition.
Many college students view campus sporting events as an opportunity for heavy drinking, both to celebrate important victories as well as to express solidarity and enhance group cohesion with fellow students," according to a study in the journal Addictive Behaviors.
Group cohesion, learning, and motivation: what more could anyone aim for in designing a freshman orientation experience?
Generally speaking, tasks should be designed to encourage co-operation and group cohesion, rather than competitiveness," the study said.
The tutors said my not joining in was wrecking group cohesion.
These elements are assessed in many widely-used comprehensive group cohesion questionnaires, such as the Group Environment Questionnaire (Carron, Widmeyer & Brawley, 1985) and the Group Attitude Scale (Evans & Jarvis, 1986), that were unsuitable for the current research due to their length and the time limitations inherent to our simulation periods.
Humor has helped to enhance group cohesion in the classroom.
Research has demonstrated that teambuilding interventions have positive effects on group cohesion (Carron and Spink, 1995; McClure and Foster, 1991).
My sociological background in small group cohesion has taught me that a group's cohesion often begins not with the group's formal goals, but within the informal experiences, which often involve the sharing of meals and life-histories, identifying common interests, and establishing a trust and interest in another person's well-being.
In a study of antecedents of organizational trust in a sample of 83 managers in a federal governmental agency, multiple regression analysis showed that marital status and work group cohesion were positively related to organizational trust (Gilbert & Tang, 1998).
By kissing, they exchanged and blended their souls or spirits, a belief capable of providing a particularly strong rationale for group cohesion (37-43).
The results also indicated that efficacy as perceived by coaches and teammates is related to the four components of group cohesion, including both social cohesion and task cohesion.