gross

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gross

 [grōs]
coarse or large; visible to the naked eye.

Gross

(grōs),
Ludwik, 20th-century U.S. oncologist. See: Gross virus, Gross leukemia virus.

gross

(grōs),
Coarse or large; large enough to be visible to the naked eye; macroscopic.
[L. grossus, thick]

gross

(grōs)
1. coarse or large.
2. visible to the naked eye without the use of magnification.

gross

Etymology: OFr, gros, large
1 macroscopic, as in gross pathology; the study of tissue changes without magnification by a microscope.
2 large or obese. Compare microscopic.

gross

(grōs)
Coarse or large; large enough to be visible to the naked eye.
[L. grossus, thick]

gross

coarse or large; visible to the naked eye.

gross energy
total energy of a feed as measured by direct calorimetry.
gross income
total income before costs have been deducted.
gross margin
total returns from an enterprise minus the variable costs incurred by the enterprise.
References in periodicals archive ?
Be not afraid of greatness" and "thou art made if thou desir'st to be so" may sound like "impossible passages of grossness," but they bear striking resemblance to the language Olivia actually uses.
If you thought Dumb And Dumber or There's Something About Mary plumbed the depths of grossness, hold on to your lunch, you ain't seen nothing yet.
He said even if there was a conviction in the District Court and it was appealed, the High Court would be "prone to hold that the subject matter fell short of that grossness necessary to sustain a charge".
Garber speaks of "Beckford's grossness or gross exaggeration," of that kind of "Orientalist tradition which sought to dazzle through every sort of extremism.
The film has moments, but if you watch the unrated version, be prepared for grossness.
The narrator describes the "striking scene: the circle of eager faces, the dingy walls, the flickering gas-jets throwing their fitful rays on the bright, flushed face, and glittering on the gold spangles of the dancer's dress, as she throws her body, first this way, then that, in the graceful movements of that most abandon [sic] of all dances, but its performance does not, for, as the narrator comments, Beryl dances with "the natural grace of passion without its grossness [,]" like "a child of the forest" (10-11).
The grossness starts on the front cover with a fake tongue that is so real I screamed.
The Streetwalkers mostly deal with complaints about discarded takeaway wrappers and bags of rubbish, but the level of grossness can be much higher.
Featured is a number of figurative artists most of whom obviously see no beauty in the human figure, no premonition of eternity--only grossness, ugliness, or absurdity.
He conveys his enthusiasm for reliving the camp experience and the self-conscious reluctance of a mature adult trying to find a way to "fit in" with the immature chatter, grossness, and directness of 12 to 16-year-olds.
However, like the rake's, his is an ultimately negative freedom-he may be free of the grossness and corruption of the world but only by his refusal to act for change.
For Smith, the mining of England's commodities by foreign merchants demonstrates the "fineness of strangers' wits, and the grossness of ours.